Regional Solutions

Optimum-scalability; utilizing the most efficient and effective perimeter or boundaries to ensure the best chance at success.

Early CT Maps

Borders-Organization

 

Vernon

Tri-Town Area

Tolland County

DCF Region

DMHAS Region

 

Capital Region

Education

    Regional Educational Services Centers (RESC)

Homelessness 

    Greater Hartford - Coordinated Access Network (CAN)

    Manchester Continuum of Care (CoC)

Phil McNally Homeless Outreach PATH    Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness

40 Towns-United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

DMHAS

Regional Substance Abuse Action Council - ERASE

Size of Communities - Neighborhood, Hamlet, Village, District, Town, City Metropolitan Region.

Sq miles Population Poverty
Level
Hartford
Springfield
New Haven
Bridgeport

 

http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/editorials/hc-ed-regional-potential-20140630,0,413958.story 

Hartford, seen from the MetLife blimp, is now at the center of a sprawling 38-town region encompassing nearly 1 million people. (Patrick Raycraft / The Hartford Courant / June 19, 2013)
Editorial

7:21 p.m. EDT, June 30, 2014

If there were no such thing as history, Greater Hartford probably would be one municipality. There might be villages or boroughs here and there, but there'd be one chief executive and one legislative body.

That of course did not happen; the region evolved from fervently local Congregational parishes into a quiltwork of small cities and towns. For a long time these independent home-ruled municipalities weren't inclined to work together in many meaningful ways. But in recent years, that has begun to change.

The ancient Puritan sense of localism has been tempered by the Yankee sense of thrift. The towns in Greater Hartford have begun to gain economies of scale by expanding the geographical base on which some governmental services are performed in other words, to act more like a region.
Purchase your Officially Licensed UConn National Championship Gear HERE!

The opportunity for better regional coordination takes a step forward today as Connecticut continues to reduce the number of planning regions from 15 to nine, with a goal of eight. As of today, the Capitol Region Council of Governments will expand to 38 towns with nearly 1 million people, a not-insignificant region.

The next steps will be key in how the region progresses in the 21st century.

Quiet Progress

The region has always had a certain level of regional activity, such as the Metropolitan District Commission, the regional sewer and water authority. CRCOG has quietly made a lot of progress in sensibly increasing regional coordination over the past decade or more. Projects completed or in the works include regional police communication, online building permits, purchasing, regional animal shelters, electronic document management and connecting towns to the statewide broadband Nutmeg Network, among others.

This is progress. Having every town perform every service is a luxury we can no longer afford. Plus, does anyone really care where their tax bill, garbage truck or rideshare van comes from, as long as it gets there?

Why look for more regional efficiency? Please. Town budgets are strained. Last week CNBC ranked Connecticut 46th in its "Top States For Business" survey. In the subcategories, Connecticut does well in education (fifth) and quality of life (14th), but very poorly in cost of doing business (47th). Part of the reason we are a high-cost state for business is taxes, and the highest share of taxes paid by businesses in the state just over a third is property taxes. Regional efficiency could lower that burden, and thus increase competitiveness.

Balance

Should we buck history and do away with towns? No, in a word. People like their towns, and they provide opportunities for civic involvement that larger cities often can't. The key is to deliver services at the level where it is most efficient. The goal should be to keep what we like about towns but make the region work better.

CRCOG should continue its push for shared or regional services, where it makes sense. Consider public safety. Greater Hartford's Homeland Security District has 41 towns with 56 separate fire departments. Does that make sense? Or transportation. Rail, bus and bike corridors rarely stop at town lines; working together could mean a better network. If the region had been planning the CTfastrak busway, it probably wouldn't have taken 16 years. Letting CRCOG manage regional transportation could free the state Department of Transportation to focus on the big stuff.

Though it may be a stretch, CRCOG ought to open a discussion of regional property tax sharing, as is done in Minneapolis and a handful of other regions. The point there is to remove the incentive for towns to compete with each other for taxpaying businesses. Hartford shouldn't be competing with Windsor or Rocky Hill, Greater Hartford should be competing with Phoenix, Charlotte and other metro regions.

We're not there yet; if we were, the proposed Hartford baseball stadium would be a regional project.

 

Andover
Ashford
Bolton
Brooklyn
Canterbury
Chaplin
Columbia
Coventry
Eastford
Ellington

Hampton
Hebron
Killingly
Mansfield

Plainfield
Pomfret
Putnam
Scotland
Somers
Stafford

Sterling
Thompson
Tolland
Union
Vernon
Willington
Windham
Woodstock

 

 


 

 

PLACE   http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/op_ed/hc-op-place-zitser-fewer-cities-0327-20140326,0,390628.story 

Merge Connecticut's Towns Into Eight Cities

The Hartford Courant

7:08 p.m. EDT, March 26, 2014

Take the cities of Jacksonville, Fla.; Nashville, Tenn.; Suffolk Va.; Anchorage, Alaska; Indianapolis, Ind.; Augusta, Ga; Louisville, Ky.; and Butte, Mont., and stitch them together. What do you get?

Connecticut.

If you combine the population and area of these cities, you have approximately the same population and area of Connecticut, except in eight rather than 169 municipalities. I suggest that eight municipalities would be vastly more efficient and less expensive than 169 towns.

 

Connecticut never had a history of strong county government. In the late 1950s, at a time when the role of regional governments in other states was beginning to increase, Connecticut abolished the remaining limited functions of its eight county governments. Given the extraordinary changes in the economy since the 1950s, as well as the substantial increase in state and local services, it is time to revisit the wisdom of having 169 relatively small cities and towns vs. perhaps eight larger municipal entities.

Some of the benefits of municipal consolidation are obvious. Fewer municipalities result in fewer department heads, such as police and fire chiefs, town clerks and assessors, educational superintendents, social services heads, etc. Eight municipalities would have more bargaining power to secure less costly contractor services and construction, as well as fewer and more uniform labor contracts.

Municipal and educational facilities could be more optimally located to maximize resources and personnel. Detroit-like bankruptcies, or inadequate services in financially distressed areas, could be minimized. Worthwhile goals may be more achievable. For example, despite the magnificent effort to create magnet schools, true desegregation in our small urban centers remains largely illusory.

This does not mean that larger has no downside. Accountability and personal contact might be lessened at the local level. However, modern telecommunications has made government more accessible. Connecticut also has hundreds, if not thousands, of villages, boroughs and neighborhoods that have retained their identity despite having little or no governmental authority, and there is no reason to believe that these local interests will not continue. We can keep what we like about our towns the civic and community groups, events and activities and give up the heavy expense.

Smaller government units can be better justified when they have the resources that can make them self-sustaining. When my grandparents came to this country from Russia, U.S. factories, affordable housing and mass transportation were often located in relatively small geographical areas, such as Hartford or New Haven, so it made sense to have a local government for these places.

But the world has changed, dramatically. Most factories are gone, many people have moved to the suburbs, commuting patterns crisscross the state's metropolitan regions. Though towns are seamlessly connected to one another, they have different tax rates and compete with one another for development. It wastes a lot of time, opportunity and energy when our metro regions are in competition with other metros around the world.

There's a practical way to evolve to larger, more efficient municipal governments in Connecticut. The state's 15 regional planning areas are being consolidated to eight that number again and each will be a council of governments, a deliberative body composed of the town's chief elected officials. The largest of these, the Capitol Region Council of Governments, has already begun providing some services on a regional basis.

Continue the process, so that the region becomes the city and the council of governments becomes in effect the new city council, with at least one representative from each of the geographical areas of the former towns, adjusted slightly to meet the constitutional one-person-one-vote standard. The new municipalities could equalize the property tax rate over a 10-year period, taking that factor out of the equation for business location, hopefully resulting in businesses locating where they can benefit the entire region.

This change might require an amendment to our state constitution. Given the magnitude of these changes, the amendment process with a statewide referendum would be appropriate. Connecticut Yankees can certainly be trusted with the last word in determining what is in their own best interests. There is nothing so sacrosanct about the form of local governments that they should be exempt from a determination of whether they most efficiently meet the needs of our citizens.

Barry Zitser of Bloomfield is a lawyer and former state consumer counsel, and sometimes teaches public policy and public health courses.

 

 

 


Homelessness

HEARTH ACT HEARTH is the legislation that governs HUD funding throughout the country to states and communities

Federal Plan to end Homelessness is "Opening Doors"

"Opening Doors CT" = state strategy aligned with Federal Plan

HEARTH requires new approaches to prevent, reduce homelessness: Coordinated Access is a central element

 

Coordinated Access Networks

      1. Client-centric focus: is at the core of the Coordinated Access. The goal of the system is for community resources to come together around the client.
      2. Coordinated Access Networks (CANs): in order to help providers to come together around clients consistent with the geographic areas in which clients tend to travel, the CT Department of Housing (DOH) and CCEH developed a map of eight Coordinated Access Networks (CANs) map below.
      3. CAN Collaboration: providers within CANs will work together from the front door of shelter through housing resources to help each client exit homelessness.

 

 


http://ctbythenumbers.info/2013/05/06/achieving-efficiency-in-human-services-delivery-proves-elusive-for-state/ 

 

Perhaps this is why they call it bureaucracy.  Even when the goal is more family-friendly, responsive and efficient operations, it requires the following:  a presentation to the Governors Cabinet on Nonprofit Health and Human Services from the state legislatures Bi-Partisan Municipal Opportunities & Regional Efficiencies (M.O.R.E.) Regional Entities Sub-Committee Human Services Working Group.  It occurred, without fanfare, at the State Capitol on May 6, 2013.

The subject:  a proposal now being considered by the state legislature to do what many in the room described as implementing a provision of law that generally dates back to the last century, circa 1992, that has been sitting on a shelf, as State Rep. Tim Bowles described it, waiting for just the right convergence of administration and legislature to take another crack at insisting on implementation.  Bowles viewed its original creation from the vantage point of the Office of Policy and Management, where he worked during the Weicker administration.

The plan, updated for 2013:  re-align the service boundaries of a series of state agencies in order to make them more easily navigable for families with troubled or challenged youth who can, at times, find themselves dealing with as many as 16 agencies and

 

 nonprofit organizations for necessary services, requiring a nightmare of navigation through agency after agency.

The state agencies involved: the Department of Social Services, Department of Developmental Services, Department of Children and Families, Department of Mental Health and Addition Services would adjust their geographic boundaries to create six service delivery areas that align with the six Regional Education Service Centers boundaries thus bringing human services and education into geographic alignment, no easy task according to those gathered to discuss the proposal.

The initiative is embodied in House Bill 5267, approved by the Human Services Committee and now awaiting House action.  Its stated goal:  to establish an integrated human service delivery system to ease access for consumers and reduce inefficiencies.

As was noted during the meeting, the bill omits the Department of Public Health from the list of participating agencies.  It also lays out a relatively aggressive time line for implementation especially weighed against two decades of delay including a plan to be submitted by 2014 that would include consolidation of office space, relocation of staff, implementation of one-stop services for referrals to services.  The one-stop centers would be required at half of agency office locations by December 2015, and the remainder by the following year.  All of which makes the stated expectation, in response to questioning by dubious Cabinet members,  that the plan implementation would move slowly taking as long as a decade even more curious, and seemingly inconsistent with the language of the bill.

The Office of Fiscal Analysis could not provide a fiscal impact for the planned service coordination, which also includes common information technology development.  The Office of Legislative Research report underscores the imperative for better coordination and collaboration by describing the status quo:  DCF has six regions covering the state.  DDA and DSS each have three regions covering the northern, southern and western parts of the state, but DSS maintains either a large regional office or a sub-office within the larger regions.  DMHAS has five service regions.

 

 

The Regional Educational Services Centers (RESC), whose boundaries would be mirrored by the other agencies, were created more than 30 years ago to furnish programs and services to Connecticuts public school districts.  RESC works with DCF, DMHAS, DMR, DPH, DSS, the Department of Corrections, Department of Education and Board of Education & Services for the Blind on statewide issues.

The M.O.R.E. Human Services Working Group proposals also calls for the establishment of pilot Regional Human Service Coordination Councils consisting of elected officials, representatives from DSS, DDS, DCF, DMHAS, DOC, ED, PH, Workforce Development Boards, Non-Profits, and Family Advocacy groups to coordinate regional efforts and continue studying and implementing more efficient service delivery.

The Governors Cabinet on Nonprofit Health and Human Services was established in September of 2011 to analyze existing public-private partnerships with respect to the states health and human services delivery systems and to make recommendations to enhance the effectiveness of those systems in regard to client outcomes, cost-effectiveness, accountability and sustainability.   Members include:

  • Co-Chair Terry Edelstein, Nonprofit Liaison to the Governor
  • Co-Chair Peter S. DeBiasi President/CEO, Access Community Action Agency
  •   Michelle Cook, State Representative
  •  Robert Dakers, Executive Finance Officer, Office of Policy and Management
  • Joette Katz, Commissioner, Department of Children and Families
  •  Terrence W. Macy Ph.D., Commissioner, Department of Developmental Services
  •  Patricia Rehmer, Commissioner, Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services
  • Dr. Jewel Mullen, Commissioner, Department of Public Health
  • Roderick L. Bremby, Commissioner, Department of Social Services
  •  Stefan Pryor, Commissioner, Department of Education
  • William Carbone, Executive Director, Judicial Branch
  • Yvette H. Bello, Executive Director, Latino Community Services
  •   Deborah Chernoff, Communications Director, SEIU 1199NE
  • Roberta Cook, President/CEO, BHcare, Inc.
  • Marcie Dimenstein, LCSW, Senior Director, Behavioral Health Connection, Inc.
  • Patrick J. Johnson, President, Oak Hill
  • Daniel J. OConnell, Ed.D., President/CEO, Connecticut Council of Family Service Agencies
  • Maureen Price-Boreland, Executive Director, Community Partners in Action
  • Anne L. Ruwet, CEO, CCARC, Inc.
  • Amy L. Porter, Commissioner, Department of Rehabilitation Services

Contact Your Local RESC

Not sure which RESC your town falls under? Check out the RESC map here.

 

Go to Education Connection Link to Education Connection website Link to Education Connection

Dr. Danuta Thibodeau
Executive Director
355 Goshen Road, P.O. Box 909
Litchfield, CT 06759
(860) 567-0863
thibodeau@educationconnection.org

Go to C.E.S. Link to C.E.S.

Dr. Evan Pitkoff
Executive Director
40 Lindeman Drive
Trumbull, CT 06611
(203) 365-8803
pitkoffe@ces.k12.ct.us

Go to CREC Link to CREC

Dr. Bruce E. Douglas
Executive Director
111 Charter Oak Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 247-2732
bdouglas@crec.org

Go to ACES Link to ACES

Dr. Craig W. Edmondson
Executive Director
350 State Street
North Haven, CT 06473
(203) 498-6817
cedmondson@aces.org

Go to EASTCONN Link to EASTCONN

Ms. Paula M. Colen
Executive Director
376 Hartford Turnpike
Hampton, CT 06247
(860) 455-0707
pcolen@eastconn.org



Go to LEARN Link to LEARN
Dr. Eileen Howley
Executive Director
44 Hatchetts Hill Road
Old Lyme, CT 06371
(860) 434-4800
ehowley@learn.k12.ct.us


 


 

Geographic Constraints Choke Hartford

http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/hc-op-place-condon-hartford-book-0206-20140205,0,2356774.column?fb_action_ids=10201909891723873&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_ref=s%3DshowShareBarUI%3Ap%3Dfacebook-like

When scholar and author Xiangming Chen came to Trinity College several years ago to found the school's Center for Urban and Global Studies, he discovered that not much had been written about Hartford and other mid-sized cities in New England.

He and graduate student Nick Bacon recruited a dozen writers, most but not all academics (I contributed a chapter) and produced a book about Hartford, referencing some other of New England's second-tier cities. "Confronting Urban Legacy Rediscovering Hartford and New England's Forgotten Cities" (Lexington Books) is just out. If you would like to become better versed about the place where you live, this would be a place to start.

The book covers commerce, education, immigration and sprawl (bad!), among other things. I'll focus on two recurring themes in the city's rise and fall: its manufacturing base and its size.

  • Tom Condon
  • Tom Condon


Hartford was the first major inland settlement in the colonial U.S. and comprised about 87 square miles including what today are the towns of West Hartford, East Hartford and Manchester. Trinity historian Andrew Walsh notes in a really first-rate chapter that "just about every significant event or trend in the nation's history has left its mark here."

Not least among them was the U.S. Industrial Revolution. Hartford became an industrial powerhouse. Its factories, along with its banks and insurance companies, made it one of richest cities on the continent in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The city we see today, minus the unfortunate highway incursions, "was largely built from 1870 to 1930 as a manufacturing city where factory workers lived in tight-packed neighborhoods within walking distance of their jobs."

In 1950, there were still 30,000 manufacturing jobs within the city limits. But the rapid erosion of manufacturing jobs over the next 30 years would spell doom. As the factories emptied, the surrounding neighborhoods "slipped further and further into poverty," a problem the city had to deal with largely by itself.

And yet, white-collar jobs increased, though most of those workers were moving out of the city. So in the late 20th century, Walsh writes, Hartford presented a double face to the world an increasingly poor core city in a fundamentally prosperous metropolitan region."

It's hard to know what might have prevented this; typewriter factories, once a Hartford staple, were going to close whether they were in Hartford, Boston or San Francisco.

For all of its remarkable achievement in the last two centuries, Hartford missed a step that might have made a huge difference it never had the power to annex adjoining land. The colonial city of 87 square miles became a city of 18 square miles as surrounding communities broke off and incorporated as separate towns.

In 1950, as Jason Rojas and Lyle Wray observe, Hartford was comparable in size to Nashville, Tenn., (22 square miles) and Raleigh, N.C., (11 square miles). By 2000, Nashville was 69 square miles and Raleigh had grown to 473 square miles. Hartford's boundaries hadn't budged and now define the smallest core city in any major metropolitan area in the country, Bacon reports.

The New York architect and planner John Carrere, who authored Hartford's 1912 city plan, assumed Hartford would expand to include the new growth outside its boundaries. A golden opportunity presented itself when the Metropolitan District Commission was created in 1929. The legislature granted the MDC a charter enabling it to perform planning and zoning functions as well as providing water and sewer services.

But the planning part never took hold because of opposition from suburban towns. No one counted on the intense localism, perhaps reflective of the region's Puritan founders, in Connecticut towns.

So Greater Hartford, Rojas and Wray conclude, is a "combination of its core city's extreme smallness and the anarchic subdivision of the rest of the of the region into an absurdly large number of tiny, but politically separate, municipalities."

Many urban problems are inherently regional. Greater Hartford is not structured to deal with much of anything beyond water and sewer on a regional basis. That's a problem. Rojas and Wray offer a bold yet sensible solution, which I will discuss in a future column.

Tom Condon can be reached at tcondon@courant.com.


  

Regional Office Information

 


For information on accessing Department of Social Services programs in your area, please follow the links below to your regional office.

 
***************************
 

NORTHERN REGION

Serving the towns of:

Andover, Avon, Ashford, Berlin, Bloomfield, Bolton, Bristol, Brooklyn, Burlington, Canterbury, Canton, Chaplin, Columbia, Coventry, Eastford, East Granby, East Hartford, East Windsor, Ellington, Enfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Granby, Hampton, Hartford, Hebron, Killingly, Manchester, Mansfield, Marlborough, New Britain, Newington, Plainfield, Plainville, Plymouth, Pomfret, Putnam, Rocky Hill, Scotland, Simsbury, Somers,  Southington, South Windsor, Stafford, Sterling, Suffield, Thompson, Tolland, West Hartford, Union, Vernon, Wethersfield, Willington, Windham, Windsor, Windsor Locks and Woodstock    

 

***************************

 

SOUTHERN  REGION 

Serving the towns of:

Ansonia, Bethany, Branford, Bozrah, Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Cromwell, Deep River, Derby, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Haven, East Lyme, Essex, Franklin, Griswold, Groton, Guilford, Haddam, Hamden, Killingworth, Lebanon, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Madison, Meriden, Middlefield, Middletown, Milford, Montville, New Haven, New London, North Branford, North Haven, North Stonington, Norwich,  Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Orange, Portland, Preston, Salem, Seymour, Shelton, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown, Wallingford, Waterford, Westbrook , West Haven and Woodbridge

 

 ***************************

 

WESTERN REGION

Serving the towns of:

Barkhamsted, Beacon Falls, Bethel, Bethlehem, Bridgeport, Bridgewater, Brookfield, Canaan, Cheshire, Colebrook, Cornwall, Danbury, Easton, Fairfield, Goshen, Hartland, Harwinton, Kent, Litchfield, Middlebury, Monroe, Morris, Naugatuck, New Fairfield, New Hartford, New Milford, Newtown, Norfolk, Norwalk, North Canaan, Oxford, Prospect, Redding, Ridgefield, Roxbury, Salisbury, Sharon, Sherman, Southbury, Stratford, Thomaston, Torrington, Trumbull, Warren, Washington, Waterbury, Watertown, Weston, Westport, Winchester, Wolcott and Woodbury.

 

***************************

For general information, please contact the Central Office

25 Sigourney Street, Hartford, CT 06106
Information and Referral: 1-800-842-1508
Toll free TDD/TTY line: 1-800-842-4524


Content Last Modified on 7/10/2013 2:24:09 PM

 


 

 

DCF

 


region14.jpg (111038 bytes)

State of CT State Senate Districts http://www.cslib.org/pathfinders/electionmaps/#Senate_Districts 

region15.jpg (67115 bytes)

State of CT State House Districts 

http://www.cslib.org/pathfinders/electionmaps/#House_Districts 

region13.gif (67745 bytes)

http://www.ct.gov/ecd/lib/ecd/20/14/townmap.gif

 

 


United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut

 


http://ctprevention.org/directory.html 

 

Regional Action Councils

A Regional Substance Abuse Action Council is a legislatively created public-private partnership comprised of community leaders. Its purpose is to establish and implement a strategic plan to develop and coordinate needed substance abuse prevention and mental health promotion services in the subregion. The members of the Regional Action Council serve as volunteers assisted by professional staff. Members include representatives of major community leadership constituencies: chief elected officials, chiefs of police, superintendents of schools, major business and professional persons, legislators, major substance abuse service providers, funders, minority communities, religious organizations and the media.

Regional Action Councils do not to provide direct prevention or treatment services to clients. Thus, they will not dilute or compromise their service development and coordinating role nor become competitive with existing service providers for scarce service-related dollars.  The services they include provide:

  • Community mobilization
  • Grant collaboration
  • Substance abuse awareness, education and prevention initiatives
  • Media advocacy
  • Program development
  • Legislative advocacy
  • Leverage funds for local initiatives
  • Community needs assessment through surveys, data collection and trainings

DMHAS provides funding annually for core administrative support and coordination of prevention initiatives. The Regional Action Council generate additional resources to support services needed in the subregion.


Legislative Mandate

The management objectives of a Regional Action Council (RAC):

  1. To conduct a data driven needs and resource assessment for the subregion to identify gaps in services along the continuum of care (including community awareness, education, primary prevention, intervention, treatment and aftercare).

  2. To develop a biannual report that includes epidemiologic profiles of substance use/abuse, problem gambling, and suicide, subregional priorities, and recommendations for changes to the community environment and programs that fill identified gaps and will reduce substance abuse by changing the community environment and to submit such report to DMHAS.

  3. To conduct fund-raising activities to fill gaps identified in the RACs report.

  4. To conduct activities to implement the initiatives identified in the report.

  5. To conduct activities to promote visibility for the Regional Action Council (but not to provide direct services).

  6. To conduct at least four meetings per year.

  7. To maintain RAC membership as described under Section 17a-671 (b) of the Connecticut General Statutes.


Prevention Core Functions

The prevention core functions listed below include the strategic focus of DMHAS:

  1. Support DMHAS planning and development of community prevention services utilizing school survey results, other local needs assessment data, science-based technologies.

  2. Support, develop and implement strategies outlined in the Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) alcohol and tobacco initiatives using 25% of DMHAS funding to support alcohol and 25% on tobacco prevention activities.

  3. Serve as a esource Center to local constituents.

  4. Participate in Learning Communities and other forums as requested by DMHAS.


 

CASAC
Capital Area Substance Abuse Council
3 Barnard Lane, First Floor
Bloomfield, CT 06002
Phone: 860.286.9333
Fax: 860.286.9334
drugfree@casac.org
http://www.casac.org
CNVRAC
Central Naugatuck Valley Regional Action Council
22 Chase River Road
Waterbury, CT 06704
Phone: 203.578.4044
Fax: 203.756.6032
cnvrac1@famintervention.com
http://www.cnvrac.org
ERASE
East of the River Action for Substance Abuse Elimination
70 Canterbury Street
East Hartford, CT 06118
Phone: 860.568.4442
Fax: 860.568.4445
Bonnie.Smith@erasect.org
http://www.erasect.org
HVCASA
Housatonice Valley Coalition Against Substance Abuse
69 Stony Hill Road
Bethel, CT 06801
Phone: 203.743.7741
Fax: 203.743.7317
housatonic.valley@snet.net
http://www.hvcasa.org
LFCRAC
Lower Fairfield County Regional Action Council
115-125 Main Street
Stamford, CT 06901
Phone: 203.356.1980 ext. 7914
Fax: 203.967.9476
rac@liberationprograms.org
http://www.lfcrac.org
MAWSAC
Meriden and Wallingford Substance Abuse Council
P.O. Box 307
Wallingford, CT 06492
Phone: 203.294.3591
Fax: 203.294.3593
mawsac@aol.com
http://www.mawsac.org
MCSAAC
Middlesex County Substance Abuse Action Council
393 Main Street
Middletown, CT 06457
Phone: 860.347.5959
Fax: 860.346.1043
betsey@mcsaac.org
http://www.mcsaac.org
MFSAC
Mid Fairfield Substance Abuse Coalition
One Park Street
Norwalk, CT 06851
Phone: 203.849.1111
Fax: 203.849.1151
lcooper@hscct.org
http://www.hscct.org/mfsac.html
NECASA
Northeast Communities Against Substance Abuse
559 Hartford Pike, Suite 210B
Dayville, CT 06241
Phone: 860.779.9253
Fax: 860.774.0827
necasa@snet.net
http://www.necasaonline.org/
RYASAP
Regional Youth/Adult Substance Abuse Project
2470 Fairfield Avenue
Bridgeport, CT 06605
Phone: 203.579.2727
Fax: 203.333.9118
jdimuzio@ryasap.org
http://www.ryasap.org/
SAAC
Substance Abuse Action Council
92 Vine Street
New Britain, CT 06052
Phone: 860.589.4985
Fax: 860.224.4751
ahamid@cmhacc.org
http://www.saacct.org/
SERAC
Southeastern Regional Action Council
620 Norwich/New London Turnpike
Uncasville, CT 06382
Phone: 860.848.2800
Fax: 860.848.2801
serac.ed@sbcglobal.net
http://www.sectrac.org/
VSAAC
Valley Substance Abuse Action Council
435 East Main Street
Ansonia, CT 06401
Phone: 203.736.8566
Fax: 203.736.2641
pmautte@bghealth.org
http://www.vsaac.org
   

 

 


 

 

Business Consultants

 

Use the contact information below to find the Business Consultants who serve your area.

 

Southwest Region
(Bridgeport, Derby, Stamford, Norwalk area)

Lori-lynn Chatlos
Bridgeport CTWorks
2 Lafayette Square
Bridgeport, CT 06604
Phone: (203) 455-2601
Fax: (203) 455-2730
lorilynn.chatlos@ct.gov
 

Dolores Ryan
Bridgeport CTWorks
2 Lafayette Square
Bridgeport, CT 06604
Phone: (203) 455-2602
Fax: (203) 455-2730
dolores.ryan@ct.gov
 

 

South Central Region
(New Haven, Meriden, Middletown area)

Peter Raymo
Hamden CTWorks
37 Marne Street
Hamden, CT 06514
Phone: (203) 859-3454
Fax: (203) 859-3284
peter.raymo@ct.gov

Tony Harris
Hamden CTWorks
37 Marne Street
Hamden, CT 06514
Phone: (203) 859-3452
Fax: (203) 859-3280
anthony.harris@ct.gov

Abby Fiedler
amden CTWorks
37 Marne Street
Hamden, CT 06514
Phone: (203) 859-3414
Fax: (203) 859-3284
abby.fiedler@ct.gov

 

 

  North Central Region
(Hartford, New Britain, Bristol, Enfield area)

Donna Smith
Hartford CTWorks
3580 Main Street
Hartford, CT 06120
Phone: (860) 256-3869
Fax: (860) 256-3840
donna.smith@ct.gov

Janice Albert
New Britain CTWorks
260 Lafayette Street
New Britain, CT 06053
Phone: (860)
827-6207
Fax: (860) 827-6210
janice.albert@ct.gov

Karen Quesnel

Enfield  CTWorks

786 Enfield Street

Enfield, CT 06082

Phone (860) 899-3559

Fax (860)-745-7376

Karen.quesnel@ct.gov


 
Eastern Region
(New London, Norwich, Willimantic area)

Mark Fillmore
Danielson CTWorks
95 Westcott Road
Danielson, CT 06239
Phone: (860) 412-7021
Fax: (860) 412-7010
mark.fillmore@ct.gov

Garth Swaby
New London CTWorks
Shaw's Cove Six
New London, CT 06320
Phone: (860) 439-7600
Fax: (860) 439-7420
garth.swaby@ct.gov

 

Northwest Region
(Waterbury, Danbury, Torrington area)
 

Sal Galasso
Waterbury CTWorks
249 Thomaston Ave.
Waterbury, CT 06702
Phone: (203) 437-3274
Fax: (203) 437-3290
sal.galasso@ct.gov

Michelle Caffe
Waterbury CTWorks
249 Thomaston Ave.
Waterbury, CT 06702
Phone: (203) 437-3308
Fax: (203) 437-3290
michelle.caffe@ct.gov


 


 


Finding a Parent Support Group
http://www.cpacinc.org/helpful-resources/parent-support/finding-a-parent-support-group/ 

Map of 6 RESC regions of Connecticut

Region 2: Fairfield County Region 6: Litchfield County Region 3: Hartford County Region 5: Windham and Tolland Counties Region 4: Middlesex and New London Counties Region 1: New Haven County

AIM (Advocate Inspired Motivation) (Deep River Region 4)

AIM is a special needs informational support group which helps families navigate the road ahead.  They welcome all special needs families and specialize in ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders).  AIMs mission is to support parents in helping create positive outcomes for families by getting involved.  They connect with other support groups statewide so that they can utilize a more cohesive support network.  They facilitate a resource library and hold all of their meetings at Tri Town Family Services Bureau in Deep River, Connecticut.  Meetings are held at 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of the month.  Please contact Joy Orr for any additional information at 860-212-0564 or joyorr@comcast.net.

All Abilities Koffee Klatch (Plainfield Region 5)

All Abilities Koffee Klatch is held at Victorian House located at 159 Norwich Road in Plainfield.  The group meets the third Friday of the month at 9:30 a.m.  For more information contact Heather Graveline at 860-546-9289 or graavelineh@yahoo.com or contact Renee Toper at 860-230-0196 or renee9901@yahoo.com.

Apraxia Resource Center of Connecticut (ARCC) (All Regions)

The Apraxia Resource Center of Connecticut is nonprofit organization and support network open to all parents and caregivers of children with apraxia of speech.  They support families from all regions in Connecticut and have several support group meeting locations in northeast Connecticut, the Hartford area, and Fairfield &New Haven counties. For a complete schedule of meetings and more information about the organization, visit www.apraxiact.com at or contact Michele Wasikowski at 203-521-6112 or by email at michelewaz@gmail.com.

Aspergers/PDD-NOS Support Group (Killingly Region 5)

The Aspergers/PDD-NOS Support Group is facilitated by the CT Family Support Network Northeast.  The group is for parents of children with Aspergers Syndrome or Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS).  Meetings are held the fourth or fifth Monday of every month at Killingly Public Library located at 25 Wescott Road in Danielson, Connecticut as well as various other northeastern Connecticut locations.  For information on specific meeting topics, or to be added to the groups listserv, please contact Northeast Regional Coordinator, Peter Szruba at 860-481-9663 or pszruba@ctfsn.org.

Autism Parents Club (Wilton Region 2)

Parents with children on the Autism Spectrum in Fairfield County, CT. Join us for a great evening out and meet other parents with children on the Autism Spectrum (Autism, PDD-NOS, Aspergers, Atypical Autism).  Parents are encouraged to share stories, learn about area resources and events, discover different interventions and learn to advocate for their child from from other experienced parents. The group meets fat 7:30 p.m. on the last Tuesday of the month at Johns Best Restaurant located at 1 Danbury Road in Wilton, Connnecticut. For more information, contact Patti Sylvia at 203-761-0248, or email pattisylvia@aol.com.

Autism Services and Resources Connecticut (ASRC) Support Groups (Statewide)

Autism Services and Resources Connecticut (ASRC) facilitates support groups for parents of children on the autism spectrum and families members throughout the state.  For more information, visit www.ct-asrc.org, email ct-asrc@sbcglobal.net or call 203-265-7717.

Bloomfield Support Group (Bloomfield Region 3)

The Bloomfield Support Group is a support group for parents of children of all ages and disabilities. The group is co-sponsored by the JP Vincent Family Resource Center in Bloomfield, the African & Caribbean American Parents of Children with Disabilities (AFCAMP) and Family Advocacy Organization for Childrens Mental Health (FAVOR). Meetings are held during the school year on the fourth Monday of each month from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Laurel Elementary School in Bloomfield, Connecticut. All are welcome. Dinner and childcare are provided. For more information please contact AFCAMP at 860-297-4358 or JP Vincent Family Resource Center at 860-769-5518 or 860-286-2640 x112.

Brain Injury Support Group  (New London Region 4)

The Brain Injury Support Group is a support group for people who have experienced brain injury, their families and friends.  The purpose of this group is to provide support and enlightenment for people whose lives have been affected by the hidden disability of brain injury.  The group meets 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Monday of every month in conference room #1 at Lawrence & Memorial Hospital 365 Montauk Avenue in New London, Connecticut.  The first meeting of the year will take place from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on September 28th.  For more information please contact Tammy Rowan at 860-271-4204.

 

The Center for Growth and Development Parent Support Group (Wilton Region 2)

 

The Center for Growth and Development is starting a new parent support group on Wednesday, November 6, 2013.  Meetings will be held on Wednesday mornings at the Center located at 84 Danbury Road in Wilton, Connecticut.  Lorraine Morley, L.M.S.W., Family Coordinator at the Center, will facilitate the group.  The group will share resources and stories with a sense of warmth and humor.  For more information, contact Lorraine at 203-563-9360 or 203-856-6191.

Child and Adolescent Network Support Group (Dayville Region 5)

Child and Adolescent Network Support Group is a support and information group for parents, families and friends of children, youth and adults with mental health challenges.  Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at United Services located at 1007 North Main Street in Dayville, Connecticut.  For more information, contact Lorna at 860-573-0689 or grivois620@comcast.net.

Childrens Therapy Services Parent Networking Support Group (Waterbury Region 1)

Childrens Therapy Services Parent Networking and Support Group is for parents of children with any disability or special health need.  Meetings are held the first Wednesday of the month from  6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Childrens Therapy Services located at 1389 West Main Street, Suite 225 in Waterbury, Connecticut.  Childcare is available with advanced request.  For more information or to RSVP, contact Cindy Jackson at 203-271-3288 or jackcts01@yahoo.com or Tracey Blackman at tracey89@charter.net.

Connecticut Down Syndrome Congress (CDSC) (Statewide)

CT Down Syndrome Congress is a special interest group that advocates for persons with Down Syndrome and their families. The group is comprised of over 350 parents, numerous professionals and over 20 advocacy groups statewide. They provide support to members through their annual convention, by co-sponsoring conferences for parents and professionals andby  hosting numerous local and state-wide activities (e.g. picnics, playgroups, moms night outs, holiday parties, etc.). For more information call 888-486-8537 or visit their website at www.ctdownsyndrome.org.

Connecticut Family Support Network (Statewide)

The Connecticut Family Support Network holds monthly meetings in various areas.    For more information, please contact the following:

Interim Executive Director: Tesha Imperati  203-710-3041  timperati@ctfsn.org

North Region: Amy McCoy  860-430-9370  amccoy@ctfsn.org

Southeast Region: April Dipollina 860-271-4371 adipollina@lmhosp.org

North Central Region: Pam Scott-Ashe 860-548-9959 pscottashe@afcamp.org

South Central Region: Deborah Pagano-Finkle 203-430-0242  dpagano@ctfsn.org

Northwest Region: Trish Butler 203-826-9739  tbutler@ctfsn.org

Southwest Region: Karleen Craddock 203-400-0105  kcraddock@ctfsn.org

Bi-Lingual Family Support: Maggy Morales 860-679-1527  mmorales@ctfsn.org

Deaf and HH Advocacy Coordinator: Patti Silva 860-529-7766  psilva@ctfsn.org

Connecticut Family Support Network Coffee Klatch Parents Group (Plainfield Region 5)

The CT Family Support Network Coffee Klatch Parents Group is open to parents who have children with disabilities and special health care needs.  The group meets on the second Thursday of every month at 9:30 a.m. at the Victorian House located at 159 Norwich Road (Route 12) in Plainfield, Connecticut. For more information, contact Peter Szruba at 860-481-9663 or pszruba@ctfsn.org.

Connecticut Family Support Network Southeastern CT (New London Region 4)

The Southeast area support group for parents of children with any disability and/or special health care needs, meets on the first Wednesday evening of the month at 6 p.m. in Conference Room 3 at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital  located at 365 Montauk Avenue in New London, Connecticut. They share frustrations, solutions and leave feeling just a little stronger. The group also offers workshops and trainings and  provide a constant update of information for people with disabilities in Connecticut. The group does not meet in July or August. For more information please contact April Dipollina at: 860-271-4371 or email her at adipollina@lmhosp.org.

Connecticut Grandparent Caregiver Support Group Listing

The Department of Social Services Aging Services Division offers a comprehensive listing of support groups for grandparent caregivers in Connecticut.  View the listing on their website to find contact information for each support group: Grandparent Caregiver Support Group Listing

Danbury Area Autism Parent Group (Bethel Region 6)

The Danbury Area Autism Parent Group is a  support group for parents and caregivers of youth with autism spectrum disorders.  The group meets the second Wednesday of every month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Walnut Hill Community Church in Bethel.  For more information contact Trish Butler at tbutler@ctfsn.org or 203-826-9739.

Epilepsy Parent Support Group (Bethel- Region 6)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT warmly invites parents and adults with epilepsy to attend this support group. The group meets at Ability Beyond Disability located at 4 Berkshire Boulevard in Bethel, Connecticut. Meetings are held from 6:15 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the first Tuesday of the month.  For more information please contact the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 800-899-3745 or efct@sbcglobal.net or Marita Ferguson at 203-748-4897.

Epilepsy Parent Support Group (Groton- Region 4)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT invites parents and adults with epilepsy, to join them on the second Wednesday of the month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Fairview located at 235 Lestertown Road in Groton, Connecticut.  For more information please contact Liz at the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 860-346-1924 or email efct@sbcglobal.net.

Epilepsy Support Group (Hartford Region 3)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT holds a support group at Hartford Hospital, located at 80 Seymour Street in Hartford, Connecticut, in the Jefferson Building in the Community Relations Room from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the last Thursday of every month.  For more information, contact Allison at allison@epilepsyct.com or call the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 860-346-1924.

Epilepsy Parent Support Group (Middletown- Region 1)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT warmly invites parents of children with epilepsy to attend this support group. The group meets at the Epilepsy Foundation of CT office building on the 2nd floor located at 386 Main Street in Middletown. Meetings are held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.on the forth Wednesday of the month.  This group is exclusive to parents who have children with autism. For more information please contact Megan at the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 800-899-3745 or email efct@sbcglobal.net.

Epilepsy Parent Support Group (Milford- Region 1)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT warmly invites parents and adults with epilepsy to attend this support group. The group meets in Auditorium C at the Milford Hospital located at 300 Seaside Avenue in Milford, Connecticut. Meetings are held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the second Monday of the month. For more information please contact Peg at the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 800-899-3745 or email efct@sbcglobal.net.

Epilepsy Support Group (Stamford- Region 2)

The Epilepsy Foundation of CT invites parents and adults with epilepsy, to join them on the second Thursday of the month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the second floor at the Stamford Government Center located at 888 Washington Boulevard in Stamford, Connecticut.  For more information please contact Marty at the Epilepsy Foundation of CT at 800-899-3745 or efct@sbcglobal.net.

Fairfield SEPTA (Fairfield Region 6)

The Fairfield SEPTA, Inc. (Special Education PTA) is a group of parents, teachers and community professionals and supporters striving to improve the education and social interactions and recreational opportunities of children with special needs.  SEPTA provides the parents of special education students with support and resources.  The group offers informative, monthly meetings.  For more information, visit www.fairfieldsepta.org.

Farmington Valley Aspergers Network (FAVAN) (Farmington Region 3)

The Farmington Valley Aspergers Network (FAVAN) is a not-for-profit, parent-run support group for parents, caregivers and families of children on the mild end of autism spectrum.  Their mission and goal is to provide education about current resources available to parents, emotional support and a safe environment for social networking with other families in the same situation.  For more information about monthly meetings please contact Shawn and Lee McFadden at 860-589-0097, by email at info@favan.org or visit them on the web at www.favan.org.

Ferguson Library (Stamford Region 2)

The Ferguson Library in Stamford has a Special Needs Center with a collection of books, videos and magazines for parents of children with special needs. This public library has also been awarded an LSTA grant to expand services to children with disabilities. Please visit their webpage to see what resources they offer at www.fergusonlibrary.org, Click on the Kids link, then on Special Needs Center.

Food Allergy Support Team of North Central CT (FAST) (Enfield Region 3)

The mission of the Food Allergy Support Team of North Central CT (FAST) is to build a strong, collaborative support team for parents of children who live with food allergies.  FAST meets monthly for mutual support and practical advice, occasionally hosts guest speakers, advocates for children and educates the local community.  Meetings are held in Somers on the first Sunday of the month.  For more information, please contact FAST at www.fastct.org, 860-265-3122 or support@fastct.org.

Friends of Autistic People (Greenwich Region 2)

Friends of Autistic People (FAP) is a parent support group dedicated to raising awareness of services and supported living arrangements needed for autistic adults and searching for help within public, private and state organizations. FAP sponsors support meetings, lectures by experts in the field and recently produced a Connecticut Access TV special on the needs of adults with autism. Participation is encouraged by families of children of all ages, professionals within the field and other supporters of the cause are invited to join as well. For more information, please call 203-661-8510, email fap.autismct@gmail.com or visit www.autisticadults.net.

Hearts, Hands and Homes Parent Support Group (Oakdale Region 4)

This parent support group is open to foster, adoptive and kinship families and their children.  Parents are encouraged to come together to discuss common concerns and build a network of support.  The group meets the fourth Tuesday of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fair Oaks Community Center located at 836 Old Colchester Road in Oakdale, Connecticut.  The group is sponsored by Hearts, Hands and Homes Community Collaborative. For more information or to RSVP, contact Alana at alana@heartshandsandhomes.org.

Hearts, Hands and Homes Parent Support Group (Groton- Region 4)

This parent support group is open to foster, adoptive and kinship families and their children.  Parents are encouraged to come together to discuss common concerns and build a network of support.  The group meets the first Wednesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Groton City Fire Department located at 416 Benham Road in Groton, Connecticut.  The group is sponsored by Hearts, Hands and Homes Community Collaborative. For more information or to RSVP, contact Alana at alana@heartshandsandhomes.org.

Hearts, Hands and Homes Parent Support Group (Norwich- Region 4)

This parent support group is open to foster, adoptive and kinship families and their children.  Parents are encouraged to come together to discuss common concerns and build a network of support.  The group meets the third Wednesday of each month from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Waterford Country School located at 2 Clinic Drive in Norwich, Connecticut.  The group is sponsored by Hearts, Hands and Homes Community Collaborative. For more information or to RSVP, contact Alana at alana@heartshandsandhomes.org.

Hearts, Hands and Homes Parent Support Group (Willimantic- Region 5)

This parent support group is open to foster, adoptive and kinship families and their children.  Parents are encouraged to come together to discuss common concerns and build a network of support.  The group meets the third Tuesday of each month from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Community Health Resources located at 1491 West Main Street in Willimantic, Connecticut.  The group is sponsored by Hearts, Hands and Homes Community Collaborative. For more information or to RSVP, contact Alana at alana@heartshandsandhomes.org.

High Functioning Autism and Developmental Delays Support Group (HiFADD) (West Hartford Region 3)

HiFADD is run by The Family Resource and Development Center, LLC in West Hartford, Connecticut.  The group meets the first Wednesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Family Resource and Development Center located at 41 N. Main Street, Suite 303, in West Hartford.  The group is for parents, other adult family members, as well as caregivers who are in need of support due to the unique demands of helping to raise children and/or adolescents with high functioning autism or other developmental delays that affect their social and emotional functioning and well being.  Groups consist of open discussion, as well as occasional guest speakers to discuss specific topics and address questions about a variety of issues.  Meetings are facilitated by Daniel Weiner, MA LPC.   Membership is available but not required to attend meetings.  For more information, contact Dan Weiner at 860-677-0028 or weinertherapy@gmail.com.

Litchfield County Autism Spectrum Association Parent Support Group (LACASA) (Winsted- Region 6)

Northwestern Connecticut Community College (NCCC), in Winsted, Connecticut, offers an evening support group for parents and caregivers of children with autism. The group is facilitated by Sharon Cable (parent) and Dr. Robert Beck (NCCC faculty member and director of the Behavioral Studies program in the college). The group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of every month. Participation is free and is open to anyone who cares for children with autism. For more information, please contact Sharon Cable at 860-693-9128 or Robert Beck at 860-738-6386 or visit www.autismsupportct.org.

NAMI-CAN (Child and Adolescent Network)  Support Group (Waterbury- Region 3)

NAMI CAN (National Alliance on Mental Illness Child and Adolescent Network) Support Group,  sponsored by NAMI Waterbury, meets on the third Wednesday of the month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at 969 West Main Street, Lower Level in Waterbury, Connecticut.  For more information please call Kim at 203-758-5844.

NAMI Valley Shore Affiliate Support Group (Old Lyme Region 4)

The NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness Child and Adolescent Network) Valley Shore Affiliate support group for families of individuals with psychiatric disabilities meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the fourth Monday of every month (except July and December) in the Church Hall at St. Agnes Church in Niantic.   For more information please contact Joan Lazar at 860-739-8822.

National Spinal Cord Injury Association, CT Chapter (Statewide)

The National Spinal Cord Injury Association provides a variety of support groups to people suffering from spinal cord injuries throughout the state of Connecticut. Their support groups allow individuals the opportunity to discuss a variety of topics with other people who also have a spinal cord injury. Support group meetings are held at many area hospitals and independent living centers throughout the state. Support groups are organized and run by NSCIA CT Chapter member volunteers.  For support group locations, dates and times please visit www.sciact.org/services.asp#support.

Next Steps Parent Support Group (Southington Region 3)

The Next Steps Parent Support Group is for parents of children with special needs in the Southington area. The group meets the fourth Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at The Summit in Plantsville. The Bristol/Farmington Collaborative sponsors this support group. For more information about the Collaborative visit www.gbfvcc.org. For more information about the support group, contact Tina Frappier at tfrap128@hotmail.com or Lori at stevelori@cox.net.

North Star  -  Support Group for Parents of Children With Autistic Spectrum Disorders or Developmental Delays (Ansonia Region  1)

The North Star Support Group is a support and resource organization for families who have children with disabilities. Meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of every month from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Derby. Please call ahead to verify meeting times and locations.  For more information call Cathy Adamczyk at 203-751-2417 or Natalie DiDente at 203-305-2468.

Not-So-Typical Autism Support Group (Hartford Region 3)

This group focuses on the well-being of parents and caregivers of children with autism.  The group is based on the principle that being the parent of a child on the autism spectrum requires new perspectives, and that in order to provide the best for your child, you must provide the best for yourself.  The group is interactive and focuses on teaching parents the tools and experiences that refresh, honor and uplift them in a positive and nourishing environment.  Offered by Hope 4 Autism, Inc in partnership with Wild Heart Coaching, LLC the group meets on the second Tuesday of every month from 6:30 p/m. to 8 p.m. in the Bank of America Room in the Hartford Public Library located at 500 Main Street in Downtown Hartford.  Registration is preferred and can be done online at: www.hope4autism.org/ wellness_center/not_so_ typical_autism_support_group.

Parent Chat (Guilford- Region 4)

Parent Chat is a shoreline support group for families of children with special needs. This group meets Tuesdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at The Women and Family Life Center, 96 Fair St.in Guilford, Connecticut. Child care is provided. Parents share ideas, concerns and information related to providing the best support and environment for their children. Educational materials and resources are available. This group provides a great opportunity to meet and talk with other parents and have fun. The group is facilitated by Deborah Pagano of the CT Family Support Network. For more information, or to register please contact Kathy Fadel of the KIDSTEPS Family and Childrens Center at 203-453-7592 ext.2 or kidsteps-fcc@sarah-inc.org.

PEAKS: Parents of East Hampton Area with Kids with Special Needs (East Hampton Region 4)

PEAKS: Parents of East Hampton Area with Kids with Special Needs is a group that provides parents with an opportunity to share information and make connections.  For more information visit the PEAKS Facebook page: www.facebook.com/groups/PEAKS.

Pizza Moms (Darien Region 2)

Pizza Moms is a group of moms of children with special needs in the Fairfield County area.  Meetings are held at 7:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month. The meetings are informal and  pizza, salad and beverages are served. For more info email Nanette at nanette618@gmail.com.

Plainfield Support Group (Plainfield Region 5)

Anyone raising a child with special needs is invited to join this support group.  The Plainfield Support Group meets the second Tuesday of every month (except July and August) at 6:30 p.m. at the Lighthouse Church on Route 14A in Plainfield, Connecticut.  For more information, contact Peter at 860-564-6400.

Ryan Woods Autism Foundation Parent Support Group (Middletown Region 1)

The Ryan Woods Autism Foundation Parent Support Group meets the third Saturday of every month from 10 a.m. to noon at 100 Riverview Center, Suite 102 in Middletown, Connecticut. Participation is free. Parents are encouraged to come share their experiences, get support and listen and learn about autism and autism spectrum disorder. Seating is limited. RSVP to rwaf@comcast.net. For more information, contact Brenda Wilson at rwaf@comcast.net or 860-346-8777.  The group does not meet in July or August.

The Sensory Processing Disorder Parent Connections Support Group (Clinton Region 4)

The Sensory Processing Disorder Parent Connections Support Group is a network that provides support, information, and understanding to anyone who lives with a child who has SPD or wants to learn more about these developmental disorders.  The group meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clinton Police Station Community Room 101 located at 170 East Main Street in Clinton, Connecticut.  For more information, please contact Kristin Cafferty at KLCafferty@sbcglobal.net or 860-227-6378.

Special Dads Group (Greenwich Region 2)

The Special Dads Group is a group for dads of children with special needs in Fairfield county and surrounding areas.  The group meets on the second Monday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at Pizza Post Restaurant located at 522 East Putnam Avenue in Greenwich, Connecticut. For more information contact Michael Beloff at michael@beloff.org or visit the website, http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/specialdads/.

Shoreline CT Down Syndrome Support Group  (Madison Region 4)

The Shoreline CT Down Syndrome Support Group is a casual and relaxed support group of individuals who share a common bond as parents, siblings and friends of children with Down Syndrome. They gather informally and periodically to discuss current issues and support each other. For more information, please contact Ellen Nixon at 203-421-3591 or by email at rmancuso02@snet.net.

SPED*NET New Canaan (New Canaan Region 2)

Special Education Network of New Canaan, Ltd. (SPED*NET New Canaan) is organized exclusively to educate the public on special education and disability-related issues.  They strive to empower parents, professionals, and students to become more effective advocates in their schools and communities, particularly in New Canaan, Connecticut, and its neighboring towns.  They serve as a resource for disability-related information, and as a parent-to-parent support and advocacy network for families of children with individual education programs (IEPs) and Section 504 Plans.    Visit www.spednet.org to learn about parent resources available in Southwestern Connecticut.

SPED*NET Wilton (Wilton Region 2)

SPED*NET, Special Education Network of Wilton, Ltd., is a not-for-profit corporation organized exclusively to educate the public about special needs, special education and disability-related issues. SPED*NET Wilton serves as an advocacy and supportive network for Connecticut families of children with special needs, especially families of children with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and Section 504 Plans.  Their yearly speaker series, free and open to the public, provides information on the latest therapies, strategies and research in the educational, medical and social realms.  Their Guide to Special Services in Connecticut, Bringing Knowledge to the Table: How to be an Effective Advocate for Your Child, presents information in a user-friendly format and in easy-to-understand language, detailing the special education process and linking readers to current websites, forms and resources.  Visit www.spednetwilton.org for more information.

Southeastern CT Special Education PTA (SETPA) (New London Region 4)

Southeastern CT SEPTA is a PTA for parents of children with special needs as well as special education staff.  It functions like a regular PTA with the focus on students who are receiving support through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Plan.  For more information about meeting times, dates and locations, contact Maureen Shea at moshea867@ct.metrocast.net.

Spanish-Speaking Support Group for Parents of Children with Disabilities (Danbury Region 6)

CT Partners in Policy Making is sponsors a support group for Spanish-speaking parents of children with disabilities to learn about special education and advocacy, share concerns and ideas and learn about resources available to help. The group is facilitated by Mio Galarza, Facilitator, Social-Community Psychologist and advocate. For more information contact Mio at 203-778-1555 or miozotisg22@yahoo.com.

Stratford SEPTA (Stratford Region 2)

Launched in 2010, the mission of Stratford SEPTA is to support, educate and inspire.  The group aims to bring together parents, families and educators to share their experiences and perspectives, provide parents with information on navigating the special education system, increase the communitys understanding of exceptional childrens abilities to reach their full potential, and enrich the lives of children and their families through education and social opportunities.   The group is open to anyone who cares about a child with any kind of individual difference that poses challenges in school and beyond.  Stratford SEPTA also has a Parent Resource Library which features books and activities available for borrowing.  View the collection at stratfordlibrary.blogspot.com. For more information, visit www.stratfordsepta.org, connect on Facebook Stratford SEPTA for the latest updates, or email info@stratfordsepta.org.

St. Vincents Developmental Services Program (Region 2)

St. Vincents Developmental Services provides children and teen social skills groups, sibling groups, parent support groups and parent workshops.  In addition, the Centers multi-disciplinary team offers diagnostic testing and evaluation, clinical counseling, community resource coordination and educational support.  Insurance accepted for clinical and evaluation services: Aetna, Anthem BCBS, Cigna, Coventry First, MHN, multi-plan, Oxford, United Behavioral Health and POMCO. For a complete schedule of meetings and more information about the programs please contact Annemarie Callagy, LCSW, 203.341.4501 or acallagy@stvincents.org, or visit www. stvincentsbehavioralhealth.org .

Success SEPTO  (Willington Region 5)

The mission of Success SEPTO is to work within local communities to encourage school districts, legislators, and families to work together. The organization strives to understand, support, and enhance education, and provide greater opportunities for children with special needs.  The group serves Ashford, Mansfield, Stafford, Tolland, Willington and other surrounding towns in Northeast Connecticut.  Meetings are held at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the Willington Public Library. All meetings are open to the public.  New members and visitors are welcome.  For more information visit their Facebook pagewww.successsepto.org or email info@successsepto.org.

Support Group for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Wallingford Region 1)

This group, sponsored by the Autism Services and Resources Connecticut (ASRC), is intended for adults with Aspergers Syndrome, High Functioning Autism or PPD who are 15 years of age or older. Participants do not need a formal diagnosis.  Meetings are held on the second Friday of every month, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at ASRC located at 101 North Plains Industrial Road in Wallingford. The group also has several social activities, such as hiking, board games and DVD nights each month.  Dave Tipping, an adult with Aspergers, facilitates this group.  For more information, please contact Dave Tipping at 203 484-2937 or nz1j@juno.com.

Support Group for Children and Families living with high functioning Autism  and Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) (Mansfield Region 5)

Natchuag Hospital facilitates support groups for children with PPD, their parents and siblings to provide support and education to parents and families raising children with PPD-NOS.  The group will connect parents with similar concerns, help families understand the needs of children with PPD, develop strategies to parent and education children with PDD, support family members who live with a child with PPD and support the children identified with having PDD.  The group meets from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on September 18th, October 16th , November 20th, December 18th, January 15th and February 12th at Natchaug Hospital located at 189 Storrs Road in Mansfield, Connecticut.  For more information or to register, contact Stan Hospod at 860-886-4850 x323 or stanley.hospod@hhchealth.org or Carleigh Hannah at 860-886-4850 x319.

Support Group for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (Waterford Region 4)

Waterford Youth Services hosts this group which meets from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month.  Free dinner and childcare are provided.  For more information, contact Waterford Youth Services at 860-444-5848.

Support Group for Parents of Children with Down Syndrome (Danbury Region 6)

A support group for parents of children with Down Syndrome is held on Fridays from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the  Brookfield YMCA.  Attendees do not need to be members of the YMCA to attend.  The group provides an opportunity for children to play and for parents to talk.  Siblings are also welcome to attend.  To participate in a meeting, please contact Jen Netter at 631-804-5806.

Support Group for Parents of Children who Struggle with Behavioral Challenges (Killingworth Region 4)

This support group is for parents of children who struggle with behavioral challenges, frustration, and inflexibility.  The group meets during the school year from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month at the Killingworth Library located at 301 Route 81 in Killingly.  The group is led by a former teacher skilled in the Collaborative Problem Solving Model articulated in the book The Explosive Child by Dr. Ross Greene.  All who could benefit from the support and encouragement of others experiencing similar challenges are welcome.  For more information, call Divinna at 860-876-0236.

Support Group for Parents of Special Needs Children Sharing and Caring (Middletown Region 1)

This support group is for parents of children with special needs. They meet on the first Thursday of every month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Grace Lutheran Church, Fellowship Room, located at 1055 Randolph Road in Middletown, Connecticut.  From more information, contact Nancy Geromin at 860-345-7397 or 860-345-8205.

SWAN Parenting Programs Support Group For Children with ADHD (South Windsor Region 3)

SWAN Parenting Programs offer a monthly support group for parents who have children with ADHD. This facilitated group offers a non-judgmental place for parents and other caregivers to share the joys and challenges of raining a child with ADHD. They meet on the last Thursday of each month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Charles Enes Community Center in South Windsor, Connecticut.  Registration is not necessary and all parents are welcome. For more information please call Parenting Educator, Ginny Molleur at 860-648-6361 ext. 314.

Talk About Curing Autism (TACA) Connecticut Chapter (Statewide)

TACA CT aims to support families affected by autism by hosting educational meetings on various topics, informal coffee talks and fun family outings. TACA CT provides a supportive community, as well as information on a wide range of treatments and programs so parents can help their children with autism thrive, reach their highest potential, and improve their quality of life.  The group is open to families affected by autism, ADD/ADHD, and sensory processing disorders.  For more information visit www.tacanow.org/local-chapters/northeast/connecticut.

Think Differently Support Group (Killingworth Region 4)

The Think Differently Support Group is for parents and caregivers of explosive/implosive children.  The group is run by a Think Kids certified mentor and focuses on the Collaborative Problem Solving approach.  The group meets on the third Wednesday of every month (except during the summer) from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Killingworth Library located at 301 Route 81.  For more information, visit www.thinkkids.org or contact Divinna Schmitt, M.Ed. at divinna@comcast.net or 860-876-0236.

Tolland Family Resource Center PCS Group (Tolland Region 5)

Tolland Family Resource Center PCS Group (Parents of Children with Special Needs) offers meetings bi-monthly on various topics for parents. For more information and dates of meetings contact Laurel Leibowitz at 860-870-6750, ext 5.

Welcome to My World Autism (New Britain Region 3)

Welcome to My World Autism is a support group for families of children with autism.  The group provides information on social/emotional issues and recreation needs for families.  They meet in the media center at Pulaski Middle School located at 757 Farmington Avenue in New Britain, Connecticut every third Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. throughout the school year.  For more information, contact Stephen or Livia Arasimowicz at 860-259-5790 or welcometomyworldautism@yahoo.com.

West Haven Local System of Care, Parent Support Group (West Haven Region 1)

The West Haven Local System of Care Parent Support Group invites parents, grandparents, caregivers and friends of children with special needs to  join them at  parent support group meetings held on the second Monday of every month.  The meetings take place from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the basement of  West Haven City Hall located at 355 Main Street in West Haven, Connecticut.  Child care is provided at all support group meetings with advance notice and registration.  For more information or to register please call 203-937-3633 or email karenmmuro@aol.com or visit www.whinc.org.

West Haven SEPTA is a Special Education Parent Teacher Association (West Haven Region 1)

West Haven SEPTA is a Special Education Parent Teacher Association.  SEPTA brings together people who are interested in special education and children with special needs and promotes an understanding of special education and strives to enrich the lives of children with special needs. West Haven SEPTA is open anyone in West Haven or surrounding Connecticut towns including (but not limited to) New Haven, Orange, Milford, Derby, Ansonia, and Woodbridge.  West Haven SEPTA meets the fourth Tuesday of each month with a couple exceptions due to holidays. The meetings take place at 6:30 p.m. in the Library of Seth G. Haley School located at 148 South Street in West Haven, Connecticut.  For more information on meeting dates and workshops, or any other questions please contact Kelly Nealy, West Haven SEPTA President, at whseptaproject@att.net or visit the SEPTA website at www.westhavensepta.wordpress.com.

 


 

 

region16.jpg (134366 bytes)

Regional Planning Organizations

http://www.ct.gov/opm/cwp/view.asp?q=383046 

Capitol Region Council of Governments
241 Main Street, 4th Floor
Hartford, Connecticut 06106-5310
Telephone: (860) 522-2217
Fax: (860) 724-1274
E-Mail: lwray@crcog.org 
Website: http://www.crcog.org  
Executive Director: Lyle Wray

Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency
225 North Main Street
Suite 304
Bristol, Connecticut 06010-4993
Telephone: 860-589-7820
Fax: 860-589-7820
E-Mail: director@ccrpa.org 
Website: www.ccrpa.org
Executive Director: Carl J. Stephani

Council of Governments of the Central Naugatuck Valley
49 Leavenworth Street, Suite 303
Waterbury, Connecticut 06702
Telephone: (203) 757-0535
Fax: (203) 756-7688
E-Mail: sgold@cogcnv.org 
Website: www.cogcnv.org
Acting Executive Director: Sam Gold

Greater Bridgeport Regional Council
Bridgeport Transportation Center
525 Water Street
Bridgeport, Connecticut 06604-4902
Telephone: (203) 366-5405
Fax: (203) 366-8437
E-Mail: bbidolli@gbrct.org
Website: www.gbrct.org
Executive Director: Brian Bidolli

Housatonic Valley Council of Elected Officials
Old Town Hall
162 Whisconier Road
Brookfield, Connecticut 06804
Telephone: (203) 775-6256
Fax: (203) 740-9167
E-Mail: director@hvceo.org
Website: http://www.hvceo.org
Executive Director: Jonathan Chew

Litchfield Hills Council of Elected Officials
42E North Street
Goshen, Connecticut 06756
Telephone: (860) 491-9884
Fax: (860) 491-3729
E-Mail: lhceo1@snet.net
Planning Director: Richard Lynn

Lower Connecticut River Valley Council of Governments
145 Dennison Road
Essex, Connecticut 06426
Telephone: (860) 581-8554
Fax: (860) 581-8543
E-Mail: lkrause@rivercog.org
Website: www.rivercog.org (pending)
Executive Director: Linda Krause

Northeastern Connecticut Council of Governments
125 Putnam Pike (Route 12)
P.O. Box 759
Dayville, Connecticut 06241-0759
Telephone: (860) 774-1253
Fax: (860) 779-2056
E-Mail: john.filchak@neccog.org
Executive Director: John Filchak

Northwestern Connecticut Council of Governments
17 Sackett Hill Road
Warren, Connecticut 06754
Telephone: (860) 868-7341
Fax: (860) 868-1195
E-Mail: nwccog1@snet.net
Executive Director: Jocelyn Ayer

South Central Regional Council of Governments
127 Washington Avenue, 4th Floor West
North Haven, Connecticut 06473 - 1715
Telephone: (203) 234-7555
Fax: (203) 234-9850
E-Mail: camento@scrcog.org
Website: www.scrcog.org 
Executive Director: Carl Amento

Southeastern Connecticut Council of Governments
5 Connecticut Avenue
Norwich, Connecticut 06360-4592
Telephone: (860) 889-2324
Fax: (860) 889-1222
E-Mail: jbutler@seccog.org
Website: www.seccog.org
Executive Director: James S. Butler

South Western Regional Planning Agency
888 Washington Boulevard - 3rd Floor
Stamford, Connecticut 06901
Telephone: (203) 316-5190
Fax: (203) 316-4995
E-Mail: lapp@swrpa.org
Website: www.swrpa.org
 Executive Director: Dr. Floyd Lapp, FAICP

Valley Council of Governments
Derby Train Station
12 Main Street
Derby, Connecticut 06418
Telephone: (203) 735-8688
Fax: (203) 735-8680
E-Mail: rdunne@valleycog.org
Website: www.valleycog.org 
Executive Director: Richard T. Dunne

Windham Region Council of Governments
700 Main Street
Willimantic, Connecticut 06226-2604
Telephone: (860) 456-2221
Fax: (860) 456-5659
E-Mail: director@wincog.org
Website: http://www.wincog.org
Executive Director: Mark N. Paquette

Office of Policy and Management
Intergovernmental Policy Division
450 Capitol Avenue - MS#54SLP
Hartford, Connecticut 06106-1379
Telephone: (860) 418-6343
Fax: (860) 418-6486
E-Mail: daniel.morley@ct.gov 
Website: http://www.ct.gov/opm
State RPO Coordinator: Daniel Morley

*OPM has recently approved the merger of the CT River Estuary and Midstate planning regions to form the Lower Connecticut River Valley Planning Region.

For Further Information, Please Contact:
Daniel Morley, phone (860) 418-6343; fax (860) 418-6486; e-mail daniel.morley@ct.gov

Link to:


 

 



http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4113/779/1600/2006%202nd%20CDpng.png

 

REGION 4

Michael Michaud, MPH,
Region 4 Manager
860-418-6900, michael.michaud@ct.gov

Serving the towns of: 

Andover, Avon, Berlin, Bloomfield, Bolton, Bristol, Burlington, Canton, East Granby, East Hartford, East Windsor, Ellington, Enfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Granby, Hartford, Hebron, Kensington, Manchester, Marlborough, New Britain, Newington, Plainville, Plymouth, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, Somers, South Windsor, Southington, Stafford, Suffield, Tolland, Vernon, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, Windsor Locks.

 

http://www.ctdatahaven.org/dbt/mapOLD.php


Regional Coverage Maps

 

 






Data Haven Towns

  • Ansonia
  • Bethany
  • Branford
  • Cheshire
  • Clinton
  • Derby
  • East Haven
  • Guilford
  • Hamden
  • Madison
  • Meriden
  • Milford
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • Oxford
  • Seymour
  • Shelton
  • Wallingford
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

United Way of Greater New Haven

  • Bethany
  • East Haven
  • Hamden
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven

  • Ansonia
  • Bethany
  • Branford
  • Cheshire
  • Derby
  • East Haven
  • Guilford
  • Hamden
  • Madison
  • Milford
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • Oxford
  • Seymour
  • Shelton
  • Wallingford
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

Regional Growth Partnership Towns

  • Bethany
  • Branford
  • East Haven
  • Guilford
  • Hamden
  • Madison
  • Meriden
  • Milford
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • Wallingford
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

South Central Connecticut Council of Government Towns

  • Bethany
  • Branford
  • East Haven
  • Guilford
  • Hamden
  • Madison
  • Meriden
  • Milford
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • Wallingford
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

Regional Workforce Development Board Towns

  • Bethany
  • Branford
  • Clinton
  • East Haven
  • Guilford
  • Hamden
  • Madison
  • New Haven
  • North Branford
  • North Haven
  • Orange
  • Wallingford
  • West Haven
  • Woodbridge

 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Administrative_divisions_of_Connecticut 

Regions

 

Regional Council of Governments of Connecticut

The dissolution of county governments in 1960 created a vacuum of power at the regional level, which created problems when it came to land use and infrastructure planning. Because the power once reserved for county governments was now in the hands of municipal administrations, major land use, environmental, and infrastructure issues often pitted one town against another, resulting in little or no progress. Complicating this, the state constitution delegates a large portion of the state's authority to the towns. That means a major multi-town project could be completely derailed if only one of the affected towns opposes the project, since the project would require each affected town to issue its own permits for the portions within its territory. This has often led to long and costly lawsuits between towns that support a regional-scale project and those opposed.

In an effort to resolve these conflicts, the State of Connecticut passed legislation in the 1980s establishing 15 regional councils, which cluster towns with similar demographics into an administrative planning region, instead of adhering to the old county structure. These regions are:

Unlike county governments, the authority of regional councils is limited to land use policymaking, infrastructure development, emergency preparedness, and long-term planning for population and economic changes for the communities within their respective jurisdiction. The regional councils have no taxing authority; they are financed by funds from the state and member towns.

Regional councils also have some limited law enforcement authority. If approved by the regional council, member towns can put forth a portion of their law enforcement resources to create regional task forces to combat organized crime and drug trafficking. With assistance from the Connecticut State Police and FBI, several regions have established such task forces. The Northern Connecticut Gang Task Force, Bridgeport Violent Crimes Task Force, and New Haven Safe Streets Gang Task Force are such examples.[3]

Council of Governments

Education DRG

Municipality, Town, City

State of CT

8 Counties

Mental Health Regions

Status Report

Analysis of the Boundaries of Logical Planning Regions

http://www.ct.gov/opm/cwp/view.asp?a=3019&q=532674 

Introduction

Connecticuts planning regions provide a geographic framework within which municipalities can jointly address common interests, and coordinate such interests with state plans and programs. State statutes authorize the secretary of the Office of Policy and Management (OPM) to designate or redesignate the boundaries of logical planning regions. The member municipalities of each planning region are authorized under state statutes to establish a formal governance structure.

Statutory Requirement

Section 16a-4c of the Connecticut General Statutes (CGS), as amended by Section 249 of Public Act 13-247, requires OPM to conduct an analysis of the boundaries of logical planning regions by January 1, 2014, and at least every twenty years thereafter. A provision of the statute allows any two or more contiguous planning regions that agree to voluntarily consolidate and begin the process of forming a single council of governments to be exempt from OPMs analysis, provided the secretary formally redesignates the consolidated region prior to January 1, 2014. OPM has conducted outreach to each regional planning organization (RPO) and consulted with all of the entities prescribed by statute.

Upon completion of OPMs analysis, the secretary must notify the chief executive officer (CEO) of each municipality located in a planning region in which the boundaries are proposed for redesignation. Within thirty days of such notice, the CEO of the municipality may appeal the proposed redesignation by petitioning the secretary to attend a meeting of the legislative body, in order to provide an opportunity for the legislative body to inform the secretary of its objections. Every effort must be made to schedule such meetings within sixty days of the petition, but in no event shall any meeting take place later than two hundred ten days after the secretarys original notice. Within sixty days after the meeting, the secretary shall notify the CEO of OPMs determination concerning the proposed redesignation.
The boundaries of planning regions resulting from OPMs analysis and subsequent municipal appeals process shall be effective January 1, 2015.

Download: Status Report - Analysis of the Boundaries of Logical Planning Regions (.PDF, 2.77 MB)

Contact Information:
Daniel Morley
Policy Development Coordinator
(860) 418-6343
daniel.morley@ct.gov



Content Last Modified on 10/1/2013 11:35:21 AM

 

EDITORIAL
State's New Region Plan Echoes Former County Setup

Editorial The Hartford Courant

7:40 p.m. EDT, October 29, 2013

In the late 1950s, Connecticut did away with its eight counties, but created a regional planning framework with 15 planning regions. It turns out that eight may have been the magic number.



There's been a growing consensus in recent years that 15 planning regions were too many in a state the size of Connecticut. (California has 17.) New laws required the state's Office of Policy and Management to conduct an analysis of the boundaries of the planning regions toward the goal of creating more logical and efficient regions, to go into effect on Jan.1.

After considering such things as commuting patterns, census data, watersheds and commercial density, the agency released its status report on Oct. 1, and lo and behold, it recommends the state have eight planning regions.


It's actually too early to tell whether the new regions will come close to replicating the old counties. A provision of the law allows contiguous regions to consolidate voluntarily, and to be exempt from the OPM remapping. One such consolidation is complete and another is almost complete, bringing the number of regions down to 13. One or two more might be in the works.

In addition, all the regions will become regional councils of government. At present, some are, and some are not.

The planning regions are a footprint in which towns can jointly address common issues and interests. The regional planners have traditionally worked in such areas as land use, transportation and economic planning. Some regions have been more successful than others. The hope is that with fewer regions and more resources, which the state is providing, the regions will be able to ramp up such things as shared services and other forms of regional cooperation.

What this change does not do is create common service delivery areas for state agencies. At present there are hundreds of different service regions for different agencies and services. Officials feel that untangling these will take time, and want to start with more logical planning regions.

It's a meaningful first step, to be sure. Region efficiency provides an opportunity to bring down the cost of government and make the state more competitive. We don't necessarily need the old counties; we do need their modern equivalent.

Copyright 2013, The Hartford Courant

 


Alphabetical listing  

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counties_in_Connecticut 
County
Population
[5][7]
Area
[5]
Map
Fairfield County 916,829 626 sq mi
(1,621 km2)
State map highlighting Fairfield County
Hartford County 894,014 736 sq mi
(1,906 km2)
State map highlighting Hartford County
Litchfield County 189,927 920 sq mi
(2,383 km2)
State map highlighting Litchfield County
Middlesex County 165,676 369 sq mi
(956 km2)
State map highlighting Middlesex County
New Haven County 862,477 606 sq mi
(1,570 km2)
State map highlighting New Haven County
New London County 274,055 666 sq mi
(1,725 km2)
State map highlighting New London County
Tolland County 152,691 410 sq mi
(1,062 km2)
State map highlighting Tolland County
Windham County 118,428 513 sq mi
(1,329 km2)
State map highlighting Windham County
3,574,097 4846

 

 

 

Population

Sq. Miles

Fairfield

916,829

626

Hartford

894,014

736

Litchfield

189,927

920

Middlesex

165,676

369

New Haven

862,477

606

New London

274,055

666

Tolland

152,691

410

Windham

118,428

513

Connecticut  

  3,574,097

 4,846

 

 


 

Alphabetical listing


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counties_in_Connecticut 
County
FIPS code
[4]
County seat
(defunct) [5]
Established
[5]
Origin
[1]
Etymology
[6]
Population
[5][7]
Area
[5]
Map
Fairfield County 001 Fairfield (1666-1853)
Bridgeport (1853-1960)
1666 One of four original counties created in Connecticut From the hundreds of acres of salt marsh that bordered the coast. 916,829 626 sq mi
(1,621 km2)
State map highlighting Fairfield County
Hartford County 003 Hartford (1666-1960) 1666 One of four original counties created in Connecticut After the county of Hertfordshire in the UK 894,014 736 sq mi
(1,906 km2)
State map highlighting Hartford County
Litchfield County 005 Litchfield (1751-1960) 1751 From parts of Fairfield County, Hartford County, and New Haven County City of Lichfield in the UK 189,927 920 sq mi
(2,383 km2)
State map highlighting Litchfield County
Middlesex County 007 Middletown (1785-1960) 1785 From parts of Hartford County and New London County Former county of Middlesex in the UK 165,676 369 sq mi
(956 km2)
State map highlighting Middlesex County
New Haven County 009 New Haven (1666-1960) 1666 One of four original counties created in Connecticut After New Haven Colony, founded as a haven in which Puritans could be free from persecution. 862,477 606 sq mi
(1,570 km2)
State map highlighting New Haven County
New London County 011 New London (1666-1960) 1666 One of four original counties created in Connecticut After London, UK 274,055 666 sq mi
(1,725 km2)
State map highlighting New London County
Tolland County 013 Tolland (1785-1889)
Rockville (1889-1960)
1785 From parts of Hartford County, and Windham County Hamlet of Tolland, Somerset, UK 152,691 410 sq mi
(1,062 km2)
State map highlighting Tolland County
Windham County 015 Windham (1726-1819)
Brooklyn (1819-1895)
Willimantic and Putnam (1895-1960)
1726 From parts of Hartford County, and New London County After Windham (now Wineham) in Sussex, England 118,428 513 sq mi
(1,329 km2)
State map highlighting Windham County

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_towns_in_Connecticut 

 

Town Date established Land area (sq mi) Population (2010) Form of government Native American name County Region
Andover 1848 15.46 3,303 Town meeting Tolland County Capitol
Ansonia (city) 1889 6.03 19,249 Mayor-council New Haven County Valley
Ashford 1714 38.79 4,100 Town meeting Windham County (None)
Avon 1830 23.12 18,098 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Barkhamsted 1779 36.22 3,799 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Beacon Falls 1871 9.78 6,049 Town meeting New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Berlin 1785 26.45 19,866 Council-manager Hartford County Central Connecticut
Bethany 1832 20.97 5,563 Town meeting New Haven County South Central
Bethel 1855 16.79 18,584 Town meeting Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Bethlehem 1787 19.36 3,607 Town meeting Litchfield County Central Naugatuck Valley
Bloomfield 1835 26.01 20,486 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Bolton 1720 14.41 4,980 Town meeting Tolland County Capitol
Bozrah 1786 19.97 2,627 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Branford 1685 21.98 28,026 Representative town meeting Totoket New Haven County South Central
Bridgeport (city) 1821 16.00 144,229 Mayor-council Pequonock Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Bridgewater 1856 16.23 1,727 Town meeting Litchfield County Housatonic Valley
Bristol (city) 1785 26.51 60,477 Mayor-council Hartford County Central Connecticut
Brookfield 1788 19.80 16,452 Town meeting Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Brooklyn 1786 28.97 8,210 Town meeting Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Burlington 1806 29.80 9,301 Town meeting Hartford County Central Connecticut
Canaan 1739 32.95 1,234 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Canterbury 1703 39.90 5,132 Town meeting Peagscomsueck Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Canton 1806 24.57 10,292 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Chaplin 1822 19.43 2,305 Town meeting Windham County Windham
Cheshire 1780 32.91 29,261 Council-manager New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Chester 1836 16.03 3,994 Town meeting Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Clinton 1838 16.28 13,260 Town meeting Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Colchester 1698 49.06 16,068 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Colebrook 1779 31.47 1,485 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Columbia 1804 21.36 5,485 Town meeting Tolland County Windham
Cornwall 1740 46.01 1,420 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Coventry 1712 37.72 12,435 Council-manager Tolland County Windham
Cromwell 1851 12.39 14,005 Town meeting Middlesex County Mid-State
Danbury (city) 1687 42.11 80,893 Mayor-council Pahquioque Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Darien 1820 12.86 20,732 Representative town meeting Fairfield County South Western
Deep River 1635 13.55 4,629 Town meeting Pattaquasset Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Derby (city) 1675 4.98 12,902 Mayor-council Paugasset New Haven County Valley
Durham 1708 23.60 7,388 Town meeting Coginchaug Middlesex County Mid-State
East Granby 1858 17.48 5,148 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
East Haddam 1734 54.33 9,126 Town meeting Macki-moodus Middlesex County Mid-State
East Hampton 1767 35.59 12,959 Council-manager Middlesex County Mid-State
East Hartford 1783 18.02 51,252 Mayor-council Podunk[1] Hartford County Capitol
East Haven 1785 12.26 29,257 Mayor-council New Haven County South Central
East Lyme 1839 34.03 19,159 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
East Windsor 1768 26.29 11,162 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Eastford 1847 28.89 1,749 Town meeting Windham County (None)
Easton 1845 27.42 7,490 Town meeting Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Ellington 1786 34.05 15,602 Town meeting Tolland County Capitol
Enfield 1683 33.38 44,654 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Essex 1852 10.36 6,683 Town meeting Patapoug Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Fairfield 1639 30.03 59,404 Representative town meeting Uncoway Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Farmington 1645 28.06 25,340 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Franklin 1786 19.51 1,922 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Glastonbury 1690 51.37 34,427 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Goshen 1739 43.66 2,976 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Granby 1786 40.69 11,282 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Greenwich 1665 47.83 61,171 Representative town meeting Patuquapaen Fairfield County South Western
Griswold 1815 34.95 11,951 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Groton 1705 31.30 40,115 Representative town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Guilford 1643 47.05 22,375 Town meeting Menunkatuck New Haven County South Central
Haddam 1662 44.03 8,346 Town meeting Middlesex County Mid-State
Hamden 1786 32.78 60,960 Mayor-council New Haven County South Central
Hampton 1786 25.00 1,863 Town meeting Windham County Windham
Hartford (city) 1635 17.31 124,775 Mayor-council Suckiag Hartford County Capitol
Hartland 1761 33.03 2,114 Town meeting Hartford County Litchfield Hills
Harwinton 1737 30.75 5,642 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Hebron 1708 36.90 9,686 Town meeting Tolland County Capitol
Kent 1739 48.47 2,979 Town meeting Scatacook Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Killingly 1708 48.52 17,370 Council-manager Aspinock Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Killingworth 1667 35.33 6,525 Town meeting Hammonasset Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Lebanon 1700 54.11 7,308 Town meeting New London County Windham
Ledyard 1836 38.14 15,051 Mayor-council New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Lisbon 1786 16.26 4,338 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Litchfield 1719 56.06 8,466 Town meeting Bantam Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Lyme 1667 31.85 2,406 Town meeting New London County Connecticut River Estuary
Madison 1826 36.20 18,269 Town meeting New Haven County South Central
Manchester 1823 27.26 58,241 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Mansfield 1702 44.46 26,543 Council-manager Noubesetuck Tolland County Windham
Marlborough 1803 23.28 6,404 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Meriden (city) 1806 23.75 60,868 Council-manager New Haven County South Central
Middlebury 1807 17.75 7,575 Town meeting New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Middlefield 1866 12.70 4,425 Town meeting Middlesex County Mid-State
Middletown (city) 1651 40.90 47,648 Mayor-council Mattabeset Middlesex County Mid-State
Milford (city) 1639 22.56 52,759 Mayor-council Wepawaug New Haven County South Central
Monroe 1823 26.13 19,479 Town meeting Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Montville 1786 42.02 19,571 Mayor-council New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Morris 1859 17.19 2,388 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Naugatuck (borough) 1844 16.39 31,862 Mayor-council New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
New Britain (city) 1850 13.34 73,206 Mayor-council Hartford County Central Connecticut
New Canaan 1801 22.13 19,738 Mayor-council Fairfield County South Western
New Fairfield 1740 20.46 13,881 Town meeting Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
New Hartford 1738 37.03 6,970 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
New Haven (city) 1638 18.85 129,779 Mayor-council Quinnipiac New Haven County South Central
New London (city) 1646 5.54 27,620 Council-manager Nameaug New London County Southeastern Connecticut
New Milford 1712 61.59 28,142 Mayor-council Weantinogue Litchfield County Housatonic Valley
Newington 1871 13.18 30,562 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Newtown 1711 57.76 27,560 Town meeting Quonapague Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Norfolk 1758 45.31 1,709 Town meeting Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
North Branford 1831 24.92 14,407 Council-manager New Haven County South Central
North Canaan 1858 19.45 3,315 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
North Haven 1786 20.77 24,093 Town meeting New Haven County South Central
North Stonington 1807 54.31 5,297 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Norwalk (city) 1651 22.81 85,603 Mayor-council Naramauke Fairfield County South Western
Norwich (city) 1662 28.33 40,493 Council-manager Mohegan New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Old Lyme 1855 23.10 7,603 Town meeting New London County Connecticut River Estuary
Old Saybrook 1854 15.04 10,242 Town meeting Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Orange 1822 17.19 13,956 Town meeting New Haven County South Central
Oxford 1798 32.89 12,683 Town meeting New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Plainfield 1699 42.27 15,405 Town meeting Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Plainville 1869 9.76 17,716 Council-manager Hartford County Central Connecticut
Plymouth 1795 21.72 12,243 Mayor-council Litchfield County Central Connecticut
Pomfret 1713 40.30 4,247 Town meeting Mashamoquet Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Portland 1841 23.40 9,508 Town meeting Middlesex County Mid-State
Preston 1687 30.90 4,726 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Prospect 1827 14.32 9,405 Mayor-council New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Putnam 1855 20.29 9,584 Town meeting Quinebaug Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Redding 1767 31.50 9,158 Town meeting Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Ridgefield 1709 34.43 24,638 Town meeting Caudatowa Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Rocky Hill 1843 13.45 19,709 Representative town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Roxbury 1796 26.23 2,262 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Salem 1819 28.95 4,151 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Salisbury 1741 57.32 3,741 Town meeting Weatogue Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Scotland 1857 18.61 1,726 Town meeting Windham County Windham
Seymour 1850 14.57 16,540 Town meeting Naugatuck New Haven County Valley
Sharon 1739 58.70 2,782 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Shelton (city) 1789 30.57 39,559 Mayor-council Quorum Fairfield County Valley
Sherman 1802 21.80 3,581 Town meeting Fairfield County Housatonic Valley
Simsbury 1670 33.88 23,511 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Somers 1734 28.34 11,444 Town meeting Tolland County Capitol
South Windsor 1845 27.96 25,709 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Southbury 1787 39.06 19,904 Town meeting New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Southington 1779 35.99 43,069 Council-manager Hartford County Central Connecticut
Sprague 1861 13.21 2,984 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Stafford 1719 57.96 12,087 Town meeting Tolland County (None)
Stamford (city) 1641 37.75 122,643 Mayor-council Rippowam Fairfield County South Western
Sterling 1794 27.23 3,830 Town meeting Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Stonington 1662 38.69 18,545 Town meeting Pawcatuck, Mistack New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Stratford 1639 17.59 51,384 Mayor-council Cupheag Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Suffield 1674 42.21 15,735 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Thomaston 1875 12.01 7,887 Town meeting Litchfield County Central Naugatuck Valley
Thompson 1785 46.94 9,458 Town meeting Windham County Northeastern Connecticut
Tolland 1715 39.71 15,052 Council-manager Tolland County Capitol
Torrington (city) 1740 39.79 36,383 Mayor-council Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Trumbull 1797 23.29 36,018 Mayor-council Fairfield County Greater Bridgeport
Union 1734 28.71 854 Town meeting Tolland County Northeastern Connecticut
Vernon 1808 17.73 29,179 Mayor-council Tolland County Capitol
Voluntown 1721 38.92 2,603 Town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Wallingford 1670 39.02 45,135 Mayor-council Quinnipiac New Haven County South Central
Warren 1786 26.31 1,461 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Washington 1779 38.19 3,578 Town meeting Litchfield County Northwestern Connecticut
Waterbury (city) 1686 28.57 110,366 Mayor-council Mattatuck New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Waterford 1801 32.75 19,517 Representative town meeting New London County Southeastern Connecticut
Watertown 1780 29.15 22,514 Council-manager Litchfield County Central Naugatuck Valley
West Hartford 1854 21.98 63,268 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
West Haven (city) 1921 10.84 55,564 Mayor-council New Haven County South Central
Westbrook 1840 15.72 6,938 Town meeting Pochaug Middlesex County Connecticut River Estuary
Weston 1787 19.80 10,179 Town meeting Aspetuck Fairfield County South Western
Westport 1835 20.01 26,391 Representative town meeting Saugatuck Fairfield County South Western
Wethersfield 1634 12.39 26,668 Council-manager Pyquag Hartford County Capitol
Willington 1727 33.27 6,041 Town meeting Tolland County (None)
Wilton 1802 26.95 18,062 Town meeting Fairfield County South Western
Winchester 1771 32.28 11,242 Council-manager Litchfield County Litchfield Hills
Windham 1692 27.07 25,268 Town meeting Windham County Windham
Windsor 1633 29.63 29,044 Council-manager Hartford County Capitol
Windsor Locks 1854 9.03 12,498 Town meeting Hartford County Capitol
Wolcott 1796 20.43 16,680 Mayor-council New Haven County Central Naugatuck Valley
Woodbridge 1784 18.83 8,990 Town meeting New Haven County South Central
Woodbury 1673 36.47 9,975 Town meeting Pomperaug Litchfield County Central Naugatuck Valley
Woodstock 1690 60.54 7,964 Town meeting Windham County Northeastern Connecticut

See also

 

 

 

 


The Lincoln Institute of Land Policy is a leading resource for key issues concerning the use, regulation, and taxation of land. Providing high quality education and research, the Institute strives to improve public dialogue and decisions about land policy.

http://www.lincolninst.edu/subcenters/regional-collaboration/

 

 


Working Across Boundaries: Principles of Regional Collaboration

Public Policy Research Institute, April 15, 2008 

A growing number of land-use issues transcend political and jurisdictional boundaries. These issues are most effectively addressed at a regional scale, somewhere between local, state, and national levels. During the past few years, people from many walks of life have experimented with a variety of regional approaches to land-use issues. While some of these initiatives augment existing government institutions, others are more ad hoc in nature. Whether formal or ad hoc, regional initiatives involve people with diverse interests and viewpoints in collaborative forumspublic spaces that would not otherwise exist to solve common problems. Although there is no single model or approach to regional collaboration, several principles have emerged to help people think and act regionally. These principles should be adapted to the unique circumstances of each place or region.

 

Principle # 1 Focus on a Compelling Purpose or Interest (Catalyst)

Most people are unaccustomed to working across boundaries. We tend to focus on the tasks immediately in front of us, within our small sphere of influence. Anything beyond that is someone elses responsibility. Our social and political arrangements further discourage working beyond our individual silos. Regional collaboration becomes compelling when people recognize that they are more likely to achieve their interests by working together than by acting independently. The objectives of regional collaboration may include one or more of the following: 

(1) building knowledge and understanding; 

(2) building community (or a sense of place and regional identity); 

(3) sharing resources; 

(4) providing input and advice; 

(5) advocating for a particular outcome; 

(6) resolving disputes; and/or 

(7) governing. 

Far from being mutually exclusive, these different objectives reinforce one another, and suggest a natural progression from knowledge- and community-building to advocacy and governance. To begin a regional initiative, focus on things that people are predisposed to do.

Principle # 2 Organize around Collaborative Leaders (Leadership)

Regional initiatives require a certain type of leadership. In contrast to exercising authority by taking unilateral actiona command-and-control model of leadership regional stewards readily cross jurisdictions, sectors, disciplines, and cultures to forge alliances with diverse interests and viewpoints. They invite people to take ownership of a shared vision and values, and they work hard to bridge differences and nourish networks of relationships. To move in the desired direction, regional stewards share power and mobilize people, ideas, and resources. In the midst of this action, they provide integrity and credibility, and advocate for the integrity of regional partnerships. They also show a high tolerance for complexity, uncertainty, and change. They emphasize dialogue and building relationships by respecting the diversity of ideas and viewpoints. Respect builds trust, which in turn fosters communication, understanding, and eventually agreement. In short, regional stewards practice regional leadership.

Principle # 3 Mobilize and Engage the Right People (Representation)

To be effective, regional initiatives must engage the right people and build a constituency for change. If your objective is to advocate for a particular interest or outcome, that will require a different group of people than if you are trying to resolve a multi-party dispute or address a multi-jurisdictional issue. In the latter cases, you should seek to be as inclusive as possibleengaging people who are interested in and affected by the issue; those needed to implement any potential recommendation (i.e., those with authority); and those who might undermine the process or the outcome if not included. Think carefully about the roles and responsibilities of existing jurisdictions and agencies, and keep in mind that there may be people outside the region who need or want to be involved.

Principle # 4 Define the Region to Match Peoples Interests (Regional

Fit)

How people define a region naturally flows from their interests and concerns. Regions are most often defined in one of two waysone rooted in a sense of place, the other based on a certain function or the territory of the problem. Natural ecological boundariessuch as watersheds, ecosystems, wildlife habitat, and so oncan help inform the appropriate definition of a region, but in the final analysis, the region must engage the hearts and minds of people, and appeal to their shared interests. The precise boundaries of a region are often less important than clarifying the core area of interest. Boundaries can be soft and flexible, adaptable to changing needs and interests. In sum, the region needs to be large enough to capture the problem, and small enough to get traction.

Principle # 5 Assemble the Necessary Resources (Capacity)

To collaborate on a regional scale, people need to be able to jump start the process, and also sustain it over time. The capacity to initiate and sustain regional collaboration hinges on four types of essential resources: leadership, a constituency for change, organization, and technical information.

Leadership comes in many forms. Some leaders are catalysts, others may be visionaries, some are good at motivating and empowering people, and some are conductorsassembling people and resources into a well-orchestrated team. The team itself is the people who are willing to speak up and work for change. It is important to find people who will consider other perspectives and negotiate in good faith toward mutually satisfying ways of addressing the issue at hand. Its also essential to engage people who have good organizational skillsthe ability to manage mailing lists, phone trees, planning materials, and budgets. Finally, most efforts to resolve regional issues rely on mountains of varied technical information. To be credible, it helps to gather and interpret this information as a group, through joint fact finding or a similar process.

In some cases, these resources must be developed from the ground up, from scratch.

But the more common experience is to borrow or leverage the resources of existing groups already working in the region. In fact, most regions already have the capacities for leadership, change, organization, and technical informationthese resources simply need to be identified and better coordinated. The following diagnostic questions can help assemble the necessary resources:

What resources (people, skills, information, funds) are needed/available to work

across boundaries?

Where can we find additional resources?

Who can help identify sources of funds and assistance?

How can available resources be used to stimulate more interest in the project?

Principle # 6 Jointly Determine Where You Want to Go and How You

Want to Get There (Strategy of Action)

People facing a regional problem or issue usually want to roll up their sleeves and get right to work. But its well worth taking a little time up front to jointly articulate desired outcomes and map out practical strategies to achieve those outcomes. Such a strategy of action is built around a shared vision for change. People negotiate among their desired outcomes until they have a package that everyone can agree on. Then they negotiate options for how to make those outcomes happen.

Every regional enterprise is unique, varying according to site-specific conditions, the nature of the issue, and the needs and interests of the people affected by the issue.

Consequently, the most effective strategies of action are homegrownthey are developed by and for the people concerned about a particular region. Developing such a strategy is an important stepit ensures that people are working toward a clearly stated and agreed upon goal, and it spells out specific steps and tools for reaching that goal. A well-drafted strategy also allows people to assess their progress against the stated goals, adapt methods as needed, and document success.

Principle # 7 Move from Vision to Action (Implementation)

The objective at this point is to strategically translate civic will into political will.

Participants can start by understanding how the proposed regional action supplements other relevant efforts. Then, they need to communicate their message to appropriate audiences, making it relevant and compelling. They need to demonstrate to political leaders and other decision-makers that the political capital to be gained is greater than any political risk they may take in supporting the action. Outreach should rely on multiple strategies to inform, educate, and mobilize people (such as media, public events, publications, web sites). Participants should also think carefully about linking their effort to established decision-making systems. Seek access to powerrather than power itselfby building bridges, coordinating actions, and doing things that would not otherwise get done.

Principle #8 Learn as You Go and Adapt as Needed (Evaluation)

Taking action should be followed by evaluating what was accomplished. This civiclearning provides the political momentum to follow-through on difficult problems. In some cases, there may be a need to sustain regional collaboration. Participants should begin by capturing, sharing, and celebrating their accomplishments, thereby reinforcing a sense of regional identity. Then, it may be valuable to revise and renew the mission, adapting to new information, opportunities, and problems. Participants will also need to identify and develop the capacities to sustain the regional initiativepeople (both current and new members), resources (money and information), and organizational structure.

Principle #9 Sustain a Regional Initiative (Governance)

After a region has come together, crafted a vision, and taken action, it is often faced with the question of whether there is a need to sustain the regional initiative. If the answer is yes, a region may decide to maintain a simple network to facilitate communication and exchange information. In other situations, it may make sense to create a more formal partnership by negotiating some type of compact or otherwise integrating regional efforts into existing institutions. Another option is to create a new organization either a new regional agency with governing or regulatory power, or a non-government entity that can serve as a convener and coordinator for future regional work. The more formal the governing arrangement, the more likely a region must address questions about who should be involved in the regional agency; what is the scope and purpose; and how will decisions be made and disputes resolved. Given the variation in the objectives of regional initiatives, it is not surprising that several different governance models have emerged. The bottom line is that the governance structure must be homegrown, it must designed to meet the needs and interests of people within the region.

 

Sum of 2010 Population       TOWN_NO TOWN RPO Name 2010 Population
RPO Name TOWN Population   1 Andover Capitol Region 3303
Capitol Region Andover 3303   2 Ansonia Valley 19249
Avon 18098   3 Ashford Northeastern Conn 4317
Bloomfield 20486   4 Avon Capitol Region 18098
Bolton 4980   5 Barkhamsted Litchfield Hills 3799
Canton 10292   6 Beacon Falls Central Naug Valley 6049
East Granby 5148   7 Berlin Central Connecticut 19866
East Hartford 51252   8 Bethany South Central Conn 5563
East Windsor 11162   9 Bethel Housatonic Valley 18584
Ellington 15602   10 Bethlehem Central Naug Valley 3607
Enfield 44654   11 Bloomfield Capitol Region 20486
Farmington 25340   12 Bolton Capitol Region 4980
Glastonbury 34427   13 Bozrah Southeastern Conn 2627
Granby 11282   14 Branford South Central Conn 28026
Hartford 124775   15 Bridgeport Greater Bridgeport 144229
Hebron 9686   16 Bridgewater Housatonic Valley 1727
Manchester 58241   17 Bristol Central Connecticut 60477
Marlborough 6404   18 Brookfield Housatonic Valley 16452
Newington 30562   19 Brooklyn Northeastern Conn 8210
Rocky Hill 19709   20 Burlington Central Connecticut 9301
Simsbury 23511   21 Canaan Northwestern Conn 1234
Somers 11444   22 Canterbury Northeastern Conn 5132
South Windsor 25709   23 Canton Capitol Region 10292
Stafford 12087   24 Chaplin Windham 2305
Suffield 15735   25 Cheshire Central Naug Valley 29261
Tolland 15052   26 Chester Lower CT River Valley  3994
Vernon 29179   27 Clinton Lower CT River Valley  13260
West Hartford 63268   28 Colchester Southeastern Conn 16068
Wethersfield 26668   29 Colebrook Litchfield Hills 1485
Windsor 29044   30 Columbia Windham 5485
Windsor Locks 12498   31 Cornwall Northwestern Conn 1420
Capitol Region Total 769598   32 Coventry Windham 12435
Central Connecticut Berlin 19866   33 Cromwell Lower CT River Valley  14005
Bristol 60477   34 Danbury Housatonic Valley 80893
Burlington 9301   35 Darien Southwestern Conn 20732
New Britain 73206   36 Deep River Lower CT River Valley  4629
Plainville 17716   37 Derby Valley 12902
Plymouth 12243   38 Durham Lower CT River Valley  7388
Southington 43069   40 East Granby Capitol Region 5148
Central Connecticut Total 235878   41 East Haddam Lower CT River Valley  9126
Central Naug Valley Beacon Falls 6049   42 East Hampton Lower CT River Valley  12959
Bethlehem 3607   43 East Hartford Capitol Region 51252
Cheshire 29261   44 East Haven South Central Conn 29257
Middlebury 7575   45 East Lyme Southeastern Conn 19159
Naugatuck 31862   47 East Windsor Capitol Region 11162
Oxford 12683   39 Eastford Northeastern Conn 1749
Prospect 9405   46 Easton Greater Bridgeport 7490
Southbury 19904   48 Ellington Capitol Region 15602
Thomaston 7887   49 Enfield Capitol Region 44654
Waterbury 110366   50 Essex Lower CT River Valley  6683
Watertown 22514   51 Fairfield Greater Bridgeport 59404
Wolcott 16680   52 Farmington Capitol Region 25340
Woodbury 9975   53 Franklin Southeastern Conn 1922
Central Naug Valley Total 287768   54 Glastonbury Capitol Region 34427
Greater Bridgeport Bridgeport 144229   55 Goshen Litchfield Hills 2976
Easton 7490   56 Granby Capitol Region 11282
Fairfield 59404   57 Greenwich Southwestern Conn 61171
Monroe 19479   58 Griswold Southeastern Conn 11951
Stratford 51384   59 Groton Southeastern Conn 40115
Trumbull 36018   60 Guilford South Central Conn 22375
Greater Bridgeport Total 318004   61 Haddam Lower CT River Valley  8346
Housatonic Valley Bethel 18584   62 Hamden South Central Conn 60960
Bridgewater 1727   63 Hampton Windham 1863
Brookfield 16452   64 Hartford Capitol Region 124775
Danbury 80893   65 Hartland Litchfield Hills 2114
New Fairfield 13881   66 Harwinton Litchfield Hills 5642
New Milford 28142   67 Hebron Capitol Region 9686
Newtown 27560   68 Kent Northwestern Conn 2979
Redding 9158   69 Killingly Northeastern Conn 17370
Ridgefield 24638   70 Killingworth Lower CT River Valley  6525
Sherman 3581   71 Lebanon Windham 7308
Housatonic Valley Total 224616   72 Ledyard Southeastern Conn 15051
Litchfield Hills Barkhamsted 3799   73 Lisbon Southeastern Conn 4338
Colebrook 1485   74 Litchfield Litchfield Hills 8466
Goshen 2976   75 Lyme Lower CT River Valley  2406
Hartland 2114   76 Madison South Central Conn 18269
Harwinton 5642   77 Manchester Capitol Region 58241
Litchfield 8466   78 Mansfield Windham 26543
Morris 2388   79 Marlborough Capitol Region 6404
New Hartford 6970   80 Meriden South Central Conn 60868
Norfolk 1709   81 Middlebury Central Naug Valley 7575
Torrington 36383   82 Middlefield Lower CT River Valley  4425
Winchester 11242   83 Middletown Lower CT River Valley  47648
Litchfield Hills Total 83174   84 Milford South Central Conn 52759
Lower CT River Valley  Chester 3994   85 Monroe Greater Bridgeport 19479
Clinton 13260   86 Montville Southeastern Conn 19571
Cromwell 14005   87 Morris Litchfield Hills 2388
Deep River 4629   88 Naugatuck Central Naug Valley 31862
Durham 7388   89 New Britain Central Connecticut 73206
East Haddam 9126   90 New Canaan Southwestern Conn 19738
East Hampton 12959   91 New Fairfield Housatonic Valley 13881
Essex 6683   92 New Hartford Litchfield Hills 6970
Haddam 8346   93 New Haven South Central Conn 129779
Killingworth 6525   95 New London Southeastern Conn 27620
Lyme 2406   96 New Milford Housatonic Valley 28142
Middlefield 4425   94 Newington Capitol Region 30562
Middletown 47648   97 Newtown Housatonic Valley 27560
Old Lyme 7603   98 Norfolk Litchfield Hills 1709
Old Saybrook 10242   99 North Branford South Central Conn 14407
Portland 9508   100 North Canaan Northwestern Conn 3315
Westbrook 6938   101 North Haven South Central Conn 24093
Lower CT River Valley  Total 175685   102 North Stonington Southeastern Conn 5297
Northeastern Conn Ashford 4317   103 Norwalk Southwestern Conn 85603
Brooklyn 8210   104 Norwich Southeastern Conn 40493
Canterbury 5132   105 Old Lyme Lower CT River Valley  7603
Eastford 1749   106 Old Saybrook Lower CT River Valley  10242
Killingly 17370   107 Orange South Central Conn 13956
Plainfield 15405   108 Oxford Central Naug Valley 12683
Pomfret 4247   109 Plainfield Northeastern Conn 15405
Putnam 9584   110 Plainville Central Connecticut 17716
Sterling 3830   111 Plymouth Central Connecticut 12243
Thompson 9458   112 Pomfret Northeastern Conn 4247
Union 854   113 Portland Lower CT River Valley  9508
Woodstock 7964   114 Preston Southeastern Conn 4726
Northeastern Conn Total 88120   115 Prospect Central Naug Valley 9405
Northwestern Conn Canaan 1234   116 Putnam Northeastern Conn 9584
Cornwall 1420   117 Redding Housatonic Valley 9158
Kent 2979   118 Ridgefield Housatonic Valley 24638
North Canaan 3315   119 Rocky Hill Capitol Region 19709
Roxbury 2262   120 Roxbury Northwestern Conn 2262
Salisbury 3741   121 Salem Southeastern Conn 4151
Sharon 2782   122 Salisbury Northwestern Conn 3741
Warren 1461   123 Scotland Windham 1726
Washington 3578   124 Seymour Valley 16540
Northwestern Conn Total 22772   125 Sharon Northwestern Conn 2782
South Central Conn Bethany 5563   126 Shelton Valley 39559
Branford 28026   127 Sherman Housatonic Valley 3581
East Haven 29257   128 Simsbury Capitol Region 23511
Guilford 22375   129 Somers Capitol Region 11444
Hamden 60960   132 South Windsor Capitol Region 25709
Madison 18269   130 Southbury Central Naug Valley 19904
Meriden 60868   131 Southington Central Connecticut 43069
Milford 52759   133 Sprague Southeastern Conn 2984
New Haven 129779   134 Stafford Capitol Region 12087
North Branford 14407   135 Stamford Southwestern Conn 122643
North Haven 24093   136 Sterling Northeastern Conn 3830
Orange 13956   137 Stonington Southeastern Conn 18545
Wallingford 45135   138 Stratford Greater Bridgeport 51384
West Haven 55564   139 Suffield Capitol Region 15735
Woodbridge 8990   140 Thomaston Central Naug Valley 7887
South Central Conn Total 570001   141 Thompson Northeastern Conn 9458
Southeastern Conn Bozrah 2627   142 Tolland Capitol Region 15052
Colchester 16068   143 Torrington Litchfield Hills 36383
East Lyme 19159   144 Trumbull Greater Bridgeport 36018
Franklin 1922   145 Union Northeastern Conn 854
Griswold 11951   146 Vernon Capitol Region 29179
Groton 40115   147 Voluntown Southeastern Conn 2603
Ledyard 15051   148 Wallingford South Central Conn 45135
Lisbon 4338   149 Warren Northwestern Conn 1461
Montville 19571   150 Washington Northwestern Conn 3578
New London 27620   151 Waterbury Central Naug Valley 110366
North Stonington 5297   152 Waterford Southeastern Conn 19517
Norwich 40493   153 Watertown Central Naug Valley 22514
Preston 4726   155 West Hartford Capitol Region 63268
Salem 4151   156 West Haven South Central Conn 55564
Sprague 2984   154 Westbrook Lower CT River Valley  6938
Stonington 18545   157 Weston Southwestern Conn 10179
Voluntown 2603   158 Westport Southwestern Conn 26391
Waterford 19517   159 Wethersfield Capitol Region 26668
Southeastern Conn Total 256738   160 Willington Windham 6041
Southwestern Conn Darien 20732   161 Wilton Southwestern Conn 18062
Greenwich 61171   162 Winchester Litchfield Hills 11242
New Canaan 19738   163 Windham Windham 25268
Norwalk 85603   164 Windsor Capitol Region 29044
Stamford 122643   165 Windsor Locks Capitol Region 12498
Weston 10179   166 Wolcott Central Naug Valley 16680
Westport 26391   167 Woodbridge South Central Conn 8990
Wilton 18062   168 Woodbury Central Naug Valley 9975
Southwestern Conn Total 364519   169 Woodstock Northeastern Conn 7964
Valley Ansonia 19249  
Derby 12902  
Seymour 16540  
Shelton 39559  
Valley Total 88250  
Windham Chaplin 2305  
Columbia 5485  
Coventry 12435  
Hampton 1863  
Lebanon 7308  
Mansfield 26543  
Scotland 1726  
Willington 6041  
Windham 25268  
Windham Total 88974  
Grand Total 3574097  

 

Sum of 2010 Population
RPO Name TOWN Population
Capitol Region Andover 3303
Avon 18098
Bloomfield 20486
Bolton 4980
Canton 10292
East Granby 5148
East Hartford 51252
East Windsor 11162
Ellington 15602
Enfield 44654
Farmington 25340
Glastonbury 34427
Granby 11282
Hartford 124775
Hebron 9686
Manchester 58241
Marlborough 6404
Newington 30562
Rocky Hill 19709
Simsbury 23511
Somers 11444
South Windsor 25709
Stafford 12087
Suffield 15735
Tolland 15052
Vernon 29179
West Hartford 63268
Wethersfield 26668
Windsor 29044
Windsor Locks 12498
Capitol Region Total 769598
Central Connecticut Berlin 19866
Bristol 60477
Burlington 9301
New Britain 73206
Plainville 17716
Plymouth 12243
Southington 43069
Central Connecticut Total 235878
Central Naug Valley Beacon Falls 6049
Bethlehem 3607
Cheshire 29261
Middlebury 7575
Naugatuck 31862
Oxford 12683
Prospect 9405
Southbury 19904
Thomaston 7887
Waterbury 110366
Watertown 22514
Wolcott 16680
Woodbury 9975
Central Naug Valley Total 287768
Greater Bridgeport Bridgeport 144229
Easton 7490
Fairfield 59404
Monroe 19479
Stratford 51384
Trumbull 36018
Greater Bridgeport Total 318004
Housatonic Valley Bethel 18584
Bridgewater 1727
Brookfield 16452
Danbury 80893
New Fairfield 13881
New Milford 28142
Newtown 27560
Redding 9158
Ridgefield 24638
Sherman 3581
Housatonic Valley Total 224616
Litchfield Hills Barkhamsted 3799
Colebrook 1485
Goshen 2976
Hartland 2114
Harwinton 5642
Litchfield 8466
Morris 2388
New Hartford 6970
Norfolk 1709
Torrington 36383
Winchester 11242
Litchfield Hills Total 83174
Lower CT River Valley  Chester 3994
Clinton 13260
Cromwell 14005
Deep River 4629
Durham 7388
East Haddam 9126
East Hampton 12959
Essex 6683
Haddam 8346
Killingworth 6525
Lyme 2406
Middlefield 4425
Middletown 47648
Old Lyme 7603
Old Saybrook 10242
Portland 9508
Westbrook 6938
Lower CT River Valley  Total 175685
Northeastern Conn Ashford 4317
Brooklyn 8210
Canterbury 5132
Eastford 1749
Killingly 17370
Plainfield 15405
Pomfret 4247
Putnam 9584
Sterling 3830
Thompson 9458
Union 854
Woodstock 7964
Northeastern Conn Total 88120
Northwestern Conn Canaan 1234
Cornwall 1420
Kent 2979
North Canaan 3315
Roxbury 2262
Salisbury 3741
Sharon 2782
Warren 1461
Washington 3578
Northwestern Conn Total 22772
South Central Conn Bethany 5563
Branford 28026
East Haven 29257
Guilford 22375
Hamden 60960
Madison 18269
Meriden 60868
Milford 52759
New Haven 129779
North Branford 14407
North Haven 24093
Orange 13956
Wallingford 45135
West Haven 55564
Woodbridge 8990
South Central Conn Total 570001
Southeastern Conn Bozrah 2627
Colchester 16068
East Lyme 19159
Franklin 1922
Griswold 11951
Groton 40115
Ledyard 15051
Lisbon 4338
Montville 19571
New London 27620
North Stonington 5297
Norwich 40493
Preston 4726
Salem 4151
Sprague 2984
Stonington 18545
Voluntown 2603
Waterford 19517
Southeastern Conn Total 256738
Southwestern Conn Darien 20732
Greenwich 61171
New Canaan 19738
Norwalk 85603
Stamford 122643
Weston 10179
Westport 26391
Wilton 18062
Southwestern Conn Total 364519
Valley Ansonia 19249
Derby 12902
Seymour 16540
Shelton 39559
Valley Total 88250
Windham Chaplin 2305
Columbia 5485
Coventry 12435
Hampton 1863
Lebanon 7308
Mansfield 26543
Scotland 1726
Willington 6041
Windham 25268
Windham Total 88974
Grand Total 3574097

 

TOWN_NO TOWN RPO Name 2010 Population
1 Andover Capitol Region 3303
2 Ansonia Valley 19249
3 Ashford Northeastern Conn 4317
4 Avon Capitol Region 18098
5 Barkhamsted Litchfield Hills 3799
6 Beacon Falls Central Naug Valley 6049
7 Berlin Central Connecticut 19866
8 Bethany South Central Conn 5563
9 Bethel Housatonic Valley 18584
10 Bethlehem Central Naug Valley 3607
11 Bloomfield Capitol Region 20486
12 Bolton Capitol Region 4980
13 Bozrah Southeastern Conn 2627
14 Branford South Central Conn 28026
15 Bridgeport Greater Bridgeport 144229
16 Bridgewater Housatonic Valley 1727
17 Bristol Central Connecticut 60477
18 Brookfield Housatonic Valley 16452
19 Brooklyn Northeastern Conn 8210
20 Burlington Central Connecticut 9301
21 Canaan Northwestern Conn 1234
22 Canterbury Northeastern Conn 5132
23 Canton Capitol Region 10292
24 Chaplin Windham 2305
25 Cheshire Central Naug Valley 29261
26 Chester Lower CT River Valley  3994
27 Clinton Lower CT River Valley  13260
28 Colchester Southeastern Conn 16068
29 Colebrook Litchfield Hills 1485
30 Columbia Windham 5485
31 Cornwall Northwestern Conn 1420
32 Coventry Windham 12435
33 Cromwell Lower CT River Valley  14005
34 Danbury Housatonic Valley 80893
35 Darien Southwestern Conn 20732
36 Deep River Lower CT River Valley  4629
37 Derby Valley 12902
38 Durham Lower CT River Valley  7388
40 East Granby Capitol Region 5148
41 East Haddam Lower CT River Valley  9126
42 East Hampton Lower CT River Valley  12959
43 East Hartford Capitol Region 51252
44 East Haven South Central Conn 29257
45 East Lyme Southeastern Conn 19159
47 East Windsor Capitol Region 11162
39 Eastford Northeastern Conn 1749
46 Easton Greater Bridgeport 7490
48 Ellington Capitol Region 15602
49 Enfield Capitol Region 44654
50 Essex Lower CT River Valley  6683
51 Fairfield Greater Bridgeport 59404
52 Farmington Capitol Region 25340
53 Franklin Southeastern Conn 1922
54 Glastonbury Capitol Region 34427
55 Goshen Litchfield Hills 2976
56 Granby Capitol Region 11282
57 Greenwich Southwestern Conn 61171
58 Griswold Southeastern Conn 11951
59 Groton Southeastern Conn 40115
60 Guilford South Central Conn 22375
61 Haddam Lower CT River Valley  8346
62 Hamden South Central Conn 60960
63 Hampton Windham 1863
64 Hartford Capitol Region 124775
65 Hartland Litchfield Hills 2114
66 Harwinton Litchfield Hills 5642
67 Hebron Capitol Region 9686
68 Kent Northwestern Conn 2979
69 Killingly Northeastern Conn 17370
70 Killingworth Lower CT River Valley  6525
71 Lebanon Windham 7308
72 Ledyard Southeastern Conn 15051
73 Lisbon Southeastern Conn 4338
74 Litchfield Litchfield Hills 8466
75 Lyme Lower CT River Valley  2406
76 Madison South Central Conn 18269
77 Manchester Capitol Region 58241
78 Mansfield Windham 26543
79 Marlborough Capitol Region 6404
80 Meriden South Central Conn 60868
81 Middlebury Central Naug Valley 7575
82 Middlefield Lower CT River Valley  4425
83 Middletown Lower CT River Valley  47648
84 Milford South Central Conn 52759
85 Monroe Greater Bridgeport 19479
86 Montville Southeastern Conn 19571
87 Morris Litchfield Hills 2388
88 Naugatuck Central Naug Valley 31862
89 New Britain Central Connecticut 73206
90 New Canaan Southwestern Conn 19738
91 New Fairfield Housatonic Valley 13881
92 New Hartford Litchfield Hills 6970
93 New Haven South Central Conn 129779
95 New London Southeastern Conn 27620
96 New Milford Housatonic Valley 28142
94 Newington Capitol Region 30562
97 Newtown Housatonic Valley 27560
98 Norfolk Litchfield Hills 1709
99 North Branford South Central Conn 14407
100 North Canaan Northwestern Conn 3315
101 North Haven South Central Conn 24093
102 North Stonington Southeastern Conn 5297
103 Norwalk Southwestern Conn 85603
104 Norwich Southeastern Conn 40493
105 Old Lyme Lower CT River Valley  7603
106 Old Saybrook Lower CT River Valley  10242
107 Orange South Central Conn 13956
108 Oxford Central Naug Valley 12683
109 Plainfield Northeastern Conn 15405
110 Plainville Central Connecticut 17716
111 Plymouth Central Connecticut 12243
112 Pomfret Northeastern Conn 4247
113 Portland Lower CT River Valley  9508
114 Preston Southeastern Conn 4726
115 Prospect Central Naug Valley 9405
116 Putnam Northeastern Conn 9584
117 Redding Housatonic Valley 9158
118 Ridgefield Housatonic Valley 24638
119 Rocky Hill Capitol Region 19709
120 Roxbury Northwestern Conn 2262
121 Salem Southeastern Conn 4151
122 Salisbury Northwestern Conn 3741
123 Scotland Windham 1726
124 Seymour Valley 16540
125 Sharon Northwestern Conn 2782
126 Shelton Valley 39559
127 Sherman Housatonic Valley 3581
128 Simsbury Capitol Region 23511
129 Somers Capitol Region 11444
132 South Windsor Capitol Region 25709
130 Southbury Central Naug Valley 19904
131 Southington Central Connecticut 43069
133 Sprague Southeastern Conn 2984
134 Stafford Capitol Region 12087
135 Stamford Southwestern Conn 122643
136 Sterling Northeastern Conn 3830
137 Stonington Southeastern Conn 18545
138 Stratford Greater Bridgeport 51384
139 Suffield Capitol Region 15735
140 Thomaston Central Naug Valley 7887
141 Thompson Northeastern Conn 9458
142 Tolland Capitol Region 15052
143 Torrington Litchfield Hills 36383
144 Trumbull Greater Bridgeport 36018
145 Union Northeastern Conn 854
146 Vernon Capitol Region 29179
147 Voluntown Southeastern Conn 2603
148 Wallingford South Central Conn 45135
149 Warren Northwestern Conn 1461
150 Washington Northwestern Conn 3578
151 Waterbury Central Naug Valley 110366
152 Waterford Southeastern Conn 19517
153 Watertown Central Naug Valley 22514
155 West Hartford Capitol Region 63268
156 West Haven South Central Conn 55564
154 Westbrook Lower CT River Valley  6938
157 Weston Southwestern Conn 10179
158 Westport Southwestern Conn 26391
159 Wethersfield Capitol Region 26668
160 Willington Windham 6041
161 Wilton Southwestern Conn 18062
162 Winchester Litchfield Hills 11242
163 Windham Windham 25268
164 Windsor Capitol Region 29044
165 Windsor Locks Capitol Region 12498
166 Wolcott Central Naug Valley 16680
167 Woodbridge South Central Conn 8990
168 Woodbury Central Naug Valley 9975
169 Woodstock Northeastern Conn 7964

 

 

Early CT Maps

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connecticut_Colony#mediaviewer/File:Ctcolony.png 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connecticut_Western_Reserve#mediaviewer/File:Ctwestclaims.png 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connecticut_Western_Reserve#mediaviewer/File:Western_Reserve_Including_the_Fire_Lands_1826.jpg 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 rank City State[5] 2013 estimate 2010 Census Change 2013 land area 2013 population density Location
1 New York[6] New York 8,405,837 8,175,133 2.82% 302.6 sq mi 27,012 per sq mi 40.6643N 73.9385W
2 Los Angeles California 3,884,307 3,792,621 2.42% 468.7 sq mi 8,092 per sq mi 34.0194N 118.4108W
3 Chicago Illinois 2,718,782 2,695,598 0.86% 227.6 sq mi 11,842 per sq mi 41.8376N 87.6818W
4 Houston[7] Texas 2,195,914 2,100,263 4.55% 599.6 sq mi 3,501 per sq mi 29.7805N 95.3863W
5 Philadelphia[8] Pennsylvania 1,553,165 1,526,006 1.78% 134.1 sq mi 11,379 per sq mi 40.0094N 75.1333W
6 Phoenix Arizona 1,513,367 1,445,632 4.69% 516.7 sq mi 2,798 per sq mi 33.5722N 112.0880W
7 San Antonio Texas 1,409,019 1,327,407 6.15% 460.9 sq mi 2,880 per sq mi 29.4724N 98.5251W
8 San Diego California 1,355,896 1,307,402 3.71% 325.2 sq mi 4,020 per sq mi 32.8153N 117.1350W
9 Dallas Texas 1,257,676 1,197,816 5.00% 340.5 sq mi 3,518 per sq mi 32.7757N 96.7967W
10 San Jose California 998,537 945,942 5.56% 176.5 sq mi 5,359 per sq mi 37.2969N 121.8193W
11 Austin Texas 885,400 790,390 12.02% 297.9 sq mi 2,653 per sq mi 30.3072N 97.7560W
12 Indianapolis[9] Indiana 843,393 820,445 2.80% 361.4 sq mi 2,270 per sq mi 39.7767N 86.1459W
13 Jacksonville[10] Florida 842,583 821,784 2.53% 747.0 sq mi 1,120 per sq mi 30.3370N 81.6613W
14 San Francisco[11] California 837,442 805,235 4.00% 46.9 sq mi 17,179 per sq mi 37.7751N 122.4193W
15 Columbus Ohio 822,553 787,033 4.51% 217.2 sq mi 3,624 per sq mi 39.9848N 82.9850W
16 Charlotte North Carolina 792,862 731,424 8.40% 297.7 sq mi 2,457 per sq mi 35.2087N 80.8307W
17 Fort Worth Texas 792,727 741,206 6.95% 339.8 sq mi 2,181 per sq mi 32.7795N 97.3463W
18 Detroit Michigan 688,701 713,777 −3.51% 138.8 sq mi 5,144 per sq mi 42.3830N 83.1022W
19 El Paso Texas 674,433 649,121 3.90% 255.2 sq mi 2,543 per sq mi 31.8484N 106.4270W
20 Memphis Tennessee 653,450 646,889 1.01% 315.1 sq mi 2,053 per sq mi 35.1035N 89.9785W
21 Seattle Washington 652,405 608,660 7.19% 83.9 sq mi 7,251 per sq mi 47.6205N 122.3509W
22 Denver[12] Colorado 649,495 600,158 8.22% 153.0 sq mi 3,923 per sq mi 39.7618N 104.8806W
23 Washington[13] District of Columbia 646,449 601,723 7.43% 61.0 sq mi 9,856 per sq mi 38.9041N 77.0171W
24 Boston Massachusetts 645,966 617,594 4.59% 48.3 sq mi 12,793 per sq mi 42.3320N 71.0202W
25 Nashville[14] Tennessee 634,464 601,222 5.53% 475.1 sq mi 1,265 per sq mi 36.1718N 86.7850W
26 Baltimore[15] Maryland 622,104 620,961 0.18% 80.9 sq mi 7,672 per sq mi 39.3002N 76.6105W
27 Oklahoma City Oklahoma 610,613 579,999 5.28% 606.4 sq mi 956 per sq mi 35.4671N 97.5137W
28 Louisville[16] Kentucky 609,893 597,337 2.10% 325.2 sq mi 1,837 per sq mi 38.1781N 85.6667W
29 Portland Oregon 609,456 583,776 4.40% 133.4 sq mi 4,375 per sq mi 45.5370N 122.6500W
30 Las Vegas Nevada 603,488 583,756 3.38% 135.8 sq mi 4,298 per sq mi 36.2277N 115.2640W
31 Milwaukee Wisconsin 599,164 594,833 0.73% 96.1 sq mi 6,188 per sq mi 43.0633N 87.9667W
32 Albuquerque New Mexico 556,495 545,852 1.95% 187.7 sq mi 2,908 per sq mi 35.1056N 106.6474W
33 Tucson Arizona 526,116 520,116 1.15% 226.7 sq mi 2,294 per sq mi 32.1543N 110.8711W
34 Fresno California 509,924 494,665 3.08% 112.0 sq mi 4,418 per sq mi 36.7827N 119.7945W
35 Sacramento California 479,686 466,488 2.83% 97.9 sq mi 4,764 per sq mi 38.5666N 121.4686W
36 Long Beach California 469,428 462,257 1.55% 50.3 sq mi 9,191 per sq mi 33.8091N 118.1553W
37 Kansas City Missouri 467,007 459,787 1.57% 315.0 sq mi 1,460 per sq mi 39.1252N 94.5511W
38 Mesa Arizona 457,587 439,041 4.22% 136.5 sq mi 3,218 per sq mi 33.4019N 111.7174W
39 Virginia Beach[15] Virginia 448,479 437,994 2.39% 249.0 sq mi 1,759 per sq mi 36.7793N 76.0240W
40 Atlanta Georgia 447,841 420,003 6.63% 133.2 sq mi 3,154 per sq mi 33.7629N 84.4227W
41 Colorado Springs Colorado 439,886 416,427 5.63% 194.5 sq mi 2,141 per sq mi 38.8673N 104.7607W
42 Omaha Nebraska 434,353 408,958 6.21% 127.1 sq mi 3,218 per sq mi 41.2647N 96.0419W
43 Raleigh North Carolina 431,746 403,892 6.90% 142.9 sq mi 2,826 per sq mi 35.8302N 78.6414W
44 Miami Florida 417,650 399,457 4.55% 35.9 sq mi 11,539 per sq mi 25.7752N 80.2086W
45 Oakland California 406,253 390,724 3.97% 55.8 sq mi 7,004 per sq mi 37.7699N 122.2256W
46 Minneapolis Minnesota 400,070 382,578 4.57% 54.0 sq mi 7,088 per sq mi 44.9633N 93.2683W
47 Tulsa Oklahoma 398,121 391,906 1.59% 196.8 sq mi 1,992 per sq mi 36.1279N 95.9023W
48 Cleveland Ohio 390,113 396,815 −1.69% 77.7 sq mi 5,107 per sq mi 41.4781N 81.6795W
49 Wichita Kansas 386,552 382,368 1.09% 159.3 sq mi 2,400 per sq mi 37.6907N 97.3427W
50 Arlington Texas 379,577 365,438 3.87% 95.9 sq mi 3,811 per sq mi 32.7007N 97.1247W
51 New Orleans[17] Louisiana 378,715 343,829 10.15% 169.4 sq mi 2,029 per sq mi 30.0686N 89.9390W
52 Bakersfield California 363,630 347,483 4.65% 142.2 sq mi 2,444 per sq mi 35.3212N 119.0183W
53 Tampa Florida 352,957 335,709 5.14% 113.4 sq mi 3,077 per sq mi 27.9701N 82.4797W
54 Honolulu[2] Hawai'i 347,884 337,256 3.15% 60.5 sq mi 5,573 per sq mi 21.3259N 157.8453W
55 Aurora Colorado 345,803 325,078 6.38% 154.1 sq mi 2,110 per sq mi 39.7082N 104.8235W
56 Anaheim California 345,012 336,265 2.60% 49.8 sq mi 6,748 per sq mi 33.8555N 117.7601W
57 Santa Ana California 334,227 324,528 2.99% 27.3 sq mi 11,901 per sq mi 33.7365N 117.8826W
58 St. Louis[15] Missouri 318,416 319,294 −0.27% 61.9 sq mi 5,157 per sq mi 38.6357N 90.2446W
59 Riverside California 316,619 303,871 4.20% 81.1 sq mi 3,745 per sq mi 33.9381N 117.3932W
60 Corpus Christi Texas 316,381 305,215 3.66% 160.6 sq mi 1,900 per sq mi 27.7543N 97.1734W
61 Lexington[18] Kentucky 308,428 295,803 4.27% 283.6 sq mi 1,043 per sq mi 38.0402N 84.4584W
62 Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 305,841 305,704 0.04% 55.4 sq mi 5,521 per sq mi 40.4398N 79.9766W
63 Anchorage[19] Alaska 300,950 291,826 3.13% 1,704.7 sq mi 171 per sq mi 61.2176N 149.8953W
64 Stockton California 298,118 291,707 2.20% 61.7 sq mi 4,730 per sq mi 37.9763N 121.3133W
65 Cincinnati Ohio 297,517 296,943 0.19% 77.9 sq mi 3,810 per sq mi 39.1399N 84.5064W
66 Saint Paul Minnesota 294,873 285,068 3.44% 52.0 sq mi 5,484 per sq mi 44.9489N 93.1039W
67 Toledo Ohio 282,313 287,208 −1.70% 80.7 sq mi 3,559 per sq mi 41.6641N 83.5819W
68 Greensboro North Carolina 279,639 269,666 3.70% 126.5 sq mi 2,131 per sq mi 36.0965N 79.8271W
69 Newark New Jersey 278,427 277,140 0.46% 24.2 sq mi 11,458 per sq mi 40.7242N 74.1726W
70 Plano Texas 274,409 259,841 5.61% 71.6 sq mi 3,630 per sq mi 33.0508N 96.7479W
71 Henderson Nevada 270,811 257,729 5.08% 107.7 sq mi 2,392 per sq mi 36.0122N 115.0375W
72 Lincoln Nebraska 268,738 258,379 4.01% 89.1 sq mi 2,899 per sq mi 40.8090N 96.6804W
73 Buffalo New York 258,959 261,310 −0.90% 40.4 sq mi 6,471 per sq mi 42.8925N 78.8597W
74 Jersey City New Jersey 257,342 247,597 3.94% 14.8 sq mi 16,737 per sq mi 40.7114N 74.0648W
75 Chula Vista California 256,780 243,916 5.27% 49.6 sq mi 4,915 per sq mi 32.6277N 117.0152W
76 Fort Wayne Indiana 256,496 253,691 1.11% 110.6 sq mi 2,293 per sq mi 41.0882N 85.1439W
77 Orlando Florida 255,483 238,300 7.21% 102.4 sq mi 2,327 per sq mi 28.4159N 81.2988W
78 St. Petersburg Florida 249,688 244,769 2.01% 61.7 sq mi 3,964 per sq mi 27.7620N 82.6441W
79 Chandler Arizona 249,146 236,123 5.52% 64.4 sq mi 3,666 per sq mi 33.2829N 111.8549W
80 Laredo Texas 248,142 236,091 5.10% 88.9 sq mi 2,655 per sq mi 27.5477N 99.4869W
81 Norfolk[15] Virginia 246,139 242,803 1.37% 54.1 sq mi 4,486 per sq mi 36.9230N 76.2446W
82 Durham North Carolina 245,475 228,330 7.51% 107.4 sq mi 2,127 per sq mi 35.9810N 78.9056W
83 Madison Wisconsin 243,344 233,209 4.35% 76.8 sq mi 3,037 per sq mi 43.0878N 89.4301W
84 Lubbock Texas 239,538 229,573 4.34% 122.4 sq mi 1,875 per sq mi 33.5665N 101.8867W
85 Irvine California 236,716 212,375 11.46% 66.1 sq mi 3,213 per sq mi 33.6784N 117.7713W
86 WinstonSalem North Carolina 236,441 229,617 2.97% 132.4 sq mi 1,734 per sq mi 36.1033N 80.2606W
87 Glendale Arizona 234,632 226,721 3.49% 60.0 sq mi 3,780 per sq mi 33.5331N 112.1899W
88 Garland Texas 234,566 226,876 3.39% 57.1 sq mi 3,974 per sq mi 32.9098N 96.6304W
89 Hialeah Florida 233,394 224,669 3.88% 21.5 sq mi 10,474 per sq mi 25.8699N 80.3029W
90 Reno Nevada 233,294 225,221 3.58% 103.0 sq mi 2,186 per sq mi 39.4745N 119.7765W
91 Chesapeake[15] Virginia 230,571 222,209 3.76% 340.8 sq mi 652 per sq mi 36.6794N 76.3018W
92 Gilbert[20] Arizona 229,972 208,453 10.32% 68.0 sq mi 3,067 per sq mi 33.3102N 111.7422W
93 Baton Rouge[21] Louisiana 229,426 229,493 −0.03% 76.9 sq mi 2,982 per sq mi 30.4485N 91.1259W
94 Irving Texas 228,653 216,290 5.72% 67.0 sq mi 3,227 per sq mi 32.8577N 96.9700W
95 Scottsdale Arizona 226,918 217,385 4.39% 183.9 sq mi 1,182 per sq mi 33.6687N 111.8237W
96 North Las Vegas Nevada 226,877 216,961 4.57% 101.3 sq mi 2,141 per sq mi 36.2830N 115.0893W
97 Fremont California 224,922 214,089 5.06% 77.5 sq mi 2,764 per sq mi 37.4944N 121.9411W
98 Boise[22] Idaho 214,237 205,671 4.16% 79.4 sq mi 2,592 per sq mi 43.5985N 116.2311W
99 Richmond[15] Virginia 214,114 204,214 4.85% 59.8 sq mi 3,415 per sq mi 37.5314N 77.4760W
100 San Bernardino California 213,708 209,924 1.80% 59.2 sq mi 3,546 per sq mi 34.1393N 117.2953W
101 Birmingham Alabama 212,113 212,237 −0.06% 146.1 sq mi 1,453 per sq mi 33.5274N 86.7990W
102 Spokane Washington 210,721 208,916 0.86% 59.2 sq mi 3,526 per sq mi 47.6736N 117.4166W
103 Rochester New York 210,358 210,565 −0.10% 35.8 sq mi 5,885 per sq mi 43.1699N 77.6169W
104 Des Moines Iowa 207,510 203,433 2.00% 80.9 sq mi 2,516 per sq mi 41.5739N 93.6167W
105 Modesto California 204,933 201,165 1.87% 36.9 sq mi 5,456 per sq mi 37.6609N 120.9891W
106 Fayetteville North Carolina 204,408 200,564 1.92% 145.8 sq mi 1,375 per sq mi 35.0851N 78.9803W
107 Tacoma Washington 203,446 198,397 2.54% 49.7 sq mi 3,990 per sq mi 47.2522N 122.4598W
108 Oxnard California 203,007 197,899 2.58% 26.9 sq mi 7,358 per sq mi 34.2023N 119.2046W
109 Fontana California 203,003 196,069 3.54% 42.4 sq mi 4,621 per sq mi 34.1088N 117.4627W
110 Columbus[23] Georgia 202,824 189,885 6.81% 216.4 sq mi 878 per sq mi 32.5102N 84.8749W
111 Montgomery Alabama 201,332 205,764 −2.15% 159.6 sq mi 1,290 per sq mi 32.3463N 86.2686W
112 Moreno Valley California 201,175 193,365 4.04% 51.3 sq mi 3,771 per sq mi 33.9233N 117.2057W
113 Shreveport Louisiana 200,327 199,311 0.51% 105.4 sq mi 1,891 per sq mi 32.4670N 93.7927W
114 Aurora Illinois 199,963 197,899 1.04% 44.9 sq mi 4,404 per sq mi 41.7635N 88.2901W
115 Yonkers New York 199,766 195,976 1.93% 18.0 sq mi 10,880 per sq mi 40.9459N 73.8674W
116 Akron Ohio 198,100 199,110 −0.51% 62.0 sq mi 3,210 per sq mi 41.0805N 81.5214W
117 Huntington Beach California 197,575 189,992 3.99% 26.7 sq mi 7,103 per sq mi 33.6906N 118.0093W
118 Little Rock Arkansas 197,357 193,524 1.98% 119.2 sq mi 1,624 per sq mi 34.7254N 92.3586W
119 Augusta[24] Georgia 197,350 195,844 0.77% 302.5 sq mi 647 per sq mi 33.3655N 82.0734W
120 Amarillo Texas 196,429 190,695 3.01% 99.5 sq mi 1,917 per sq mi 35.1978N 101.8287W
121 Glendale California 196,021 191,719 2.24% 30.5 sq mi 6,295 per sq mi 34.1814N 118.2458W
122 Mobile Alabama 194,899 195,111 −0.11% 139.1 sq mi 1,403 per sq mi 30.6684N 88.1002W
123 Grand Rapids Michigan 192,294 188,040 2.26% 44.4 sq mi 4,236 per sq mi 42.9612N 85.6556W
124 Salt Lake City Utah 191,180 186,440 2.54% 111.1 sq mi 1,678 per sq mi 40.7785N 111.9314W
125 Tallahassee Florida 186,411 181,376 2.78% 100.2 sq mi 1,809 per sq mi 30.4551N 84.2534W
126 Huntsville Alabama 186,254 180,105 3.41% 209.1 sq mi 862 per sq mi 34.7843N 86.5390W
127 Grand Prairie Texas 183,372 175,396 4.55% 72.1 sq mi 2,433 per sq mi 32.6842N 97.0210W
128 Knoxville Tennessee 183,270 178,874 2.46% 98.5 sq mi 1,816 per sq mi 35.9709N 83.9465W
129 Worcester Massachusetts 182,544 181,045 0.83% 37.4 sq mi 4,845 per sq mi 42.2695N 71.8078W
130 Newport News[15] Virginia 182,020 180,719 0.72% 68.7 sq mi 2,630 per sq mi 37.0760N 76.5217W
131 Brownsville Texas 181,860 175,023 3.91% 132.3 sq mi 1,323 per sq mi 26.0183N 97.4538W
132 Overland Park Kansas 181,260 173,372 4.55% 74.8 sq mi 2,317 per sq mi 38.8890N 94.6906W
133 Santa Clarita California 179,590 176,320 1.85% 52.7 sq mi 3,345 per sq mi 34.4049N 118.5047W
134 Providence Rhode Island 177,994 178,042 −0.03% 18.4 sq mi 9,676 per sq mi 41.8231N 71.4188W
135 Garden Grove California 175,140 170,883 2.49% 17.9 sq mi 9,525 per sq mi 33.7788N 117.9605W
136 Chattanooga Tennessee 173,366 167,674 3.39% 137.2 sq mi 1,223 per sq mi 35.0665N 85.2471W
137 Oceanside California 172,794 167,086 3.42% 41.2 sq mi 4,052 per sq mi 33.2246N 117.3062W
138 Jackson Mississippi 172,638 173,514 −0.50% 111.0 sq mi 1,563 per sq mi 32.3158N 90.2128W
139 Fort Lauderdale Florida 172,389 165,521 4.15% 34.8 sq mi 4,761 per sq mi 26.1413N 80.1439W
140 Santa Rosa California 171,990 167,815 2.49% 41.3 sq mi 4,064 per sq mi 38.4468N 122.7061W
141 Rancho Cucamonga California 171,386 165,269 3.70% 39.9 sq mi 4,147 per sq mi 34.1233N 117.5642W
142 Port St. Lucie Florida 171,016 164,603 3.90% 114.0 sq mi 1,444 per sq mi 27.2810N 80.3838W
143 Tempe Arizona 168,228 161,719 4.02% 39.9 sq mi 4,050 per sq mi 33.3884N 111.9318W
144 Ontario California 167,500 163,924 2.18% 49.9 sq mi 3,282 per sq mi 34.0395N 117.6088W
145 Vancouver Washington 167,405 161,791 3.47% 46.5 sq mi 3,483 per sq mi 45.6372N 122.5965W
146 Cape Coral Florida 165,831 154,305 7.47% 105.7 sq mi 1,460 per sq mi 26.6431N 81.9973W
147 Sioux Falls South Dakota 164,676 153,888 7.01% 73.0 sq mi 2,109 per sq mi 43.5383N 96.7320W
148 Springfield Missouri 164,122 159,498 2.90% 81.7 sq mi 1,952 per sq mi 37.1942N 93.2913W
149 Peoria Arizona 162,592 154,065 5.53% 174.4 sq mi 883 per sq mi 33.7877N 112.3111W
150 Pembroke Pines Florida 162,329 154,019 5.40% 33.1 sq mi 4,672 per sq mi 26.0212N 80.3404W
151 Elk Grove California 161,007 153,015 5.22% 42.2 sq mi 3,627 per sq mi 38.4144N 121.3849W
152 Salem Oregon 160,614 154,637 3.87% 47.9 sq mi 3,229 per sq mi 44.9237N 123.0231W
153 Lancaster California 159,523 156,633 1.85% 94.3 sq mi 1,661 per sq mi 34.6936N 118.1753W
154 Corona California 159,503 152,374 4.68% 38.8 sq mi 3,925 per sq mi 33.8624N 117.5639W
155 Eugene Oregon 159,190 156,185 1.92% 43.7 sq mi 3,572 per sq mi 44.0567N 123.1162W
156 Palmdale California 157,161 152,750 2.89% 106.0 sq mi 1,442 per sq mi 34.5913N 118.1090W
157 Salinas California 155,662 150,441 3.47% 23.2 sq mi 6,490 per sq mi 36.6902N 121.6337W
158 Springfield Massachusetts 153,703 153,060 0.42% 31.9 sq mi 4,803 per sq mi 42.1155N 72.5400W
159 Pasadena Texas 152,735 149,043 2.48% 42.8 sq mi 3,485 per sq mi 29.6583N 95.1505W
160 Fort Collins Colorado 152,061 143,986 5.61% 54.3 sq mi 2,653 per sq mi 40.5482N 105.0648W
161 Hayward California 151,574 144,186 5.12% 45.3 sq mi 3,181 per sq mi 37.6281N 122.1063W
162 Pomona California 151,348 149,058 1.54% 23.0 sq mi 6,494 per sq mi 34.0586N 117.7613W
163 Cary[25] North Carolina 151,088 135,234 11.72% 54.3 sq mi 2,488 per sq mi 35.7821N 78.8141W
164 Rockford Illinois 150,251 152,871 −1.71% 61.1 sq mi 2,503 per sq mi 42.2634N 89.0628W
165 Alexandria[15] Virginia 148,892 139,966 6.38% 15.0 sq mi 9,314 per sq mi 38.8183N 77.0820W
166 Escondido California 148,738 143,911 3.35% 36.8 sq mi 3,909 per sq mi 33.1336N 117.0732W
167 McKinney Texas 148,559 131,117 13.30% 62.2 sq mi 2,108 per sq mi 33.2012N 96.6680W
168 Kansas City[26] Kansas 148,483 145,786 1.85% 124.8 sq mi 1,168 per sq mi 39.1225N 94.7418W
169 Joliet Illinois 147,806 147,433 0.25% 62.1 sq mi 2,374 per sq mi 41.5181N 88.1584W
170 Sunnyvale California 147,559 140,081 5.34% 22.0 sq mi 6,371 per sq mi 37.3858N 122.0263W
171 Torrance California 147,478 145,438 1.40% 20.5 sq mi 7,102 per sq mi 33.8350N 118.3414W
172 Bridgeport Connecticut 147,216 144,229 2.07% 16.0 sq mi 9,029 per sq mi 41.1874N 73.1957W
173 Lakewood Colorado 147,214 142,980 2.96% 42.9 sq mi 3,334 per sq mi 39.6989N 105.1176W
174 Hollywood Florida 146,526 140,768 4.09% 27.4 sq mi 5,144 per sq mi 26.0311N 80.1646W
175 Paterson New Jersey 145,948 146,199 −0.17% 8.4 sq mi 17,346 per sq mi 40.9147N 74.1628W
176 Naperville Illinois 144,864 141,853 2.12% 38.8 sq mi 3,659 per sq mi 41.7492N 88.1620W
177 Syracuse New York 144,669 145,170 −0.35% 25.0 sq mi 5,797 per sq mi 43.0410N 76.1436W
178 Mesquite Texas 143,484 139,824 2.62% 46.0 sq mi 3,038 per sq mi 32.7639N 96.5924W
179 Dayton Ohio 143,355 141,527 1.29% 55.7 sq mi 2,543 per sq mi 39.7774N 84.1996W
180 Savannah Georgia 142,772 136,286 4.76% 103.2 sq mi 1,321 per sq mi 32.0025N 81.1536W
181 Clarksville Tennessee 142,357 132,929 7.09% 97.6 sq mi 1,362 per sq mi 36.5664N 87.3452W
182 Orange California 139,969 136,416 2.60% 24.8 sq mi 5,501 per sq mi 33.8048N 117.8249W
183 Pasadena California 139,731 137,122 1.90% 23.0 sq mi 5,970 per sq mi 34.1606N 118.1396W
184 Fullerton California 138,981 135,161 2.83% 22.4 sq mi 6,047 per sq mi 33.8857N 117.9280W
185 Killeen Texas 137,147 127,921 7.21% 53.6 sq mi 2,387 per sq mi 31.0777N 97.7320W
186 Frisco Texas 136,791 116,989 16.93% 61.8 sq mi 1,893 per sq mi 33.1510N 96.8193W
187 Hampton[15] Virginia 136,699 137,436 −0.54% 51.4 sq mi 2,673 per sq mi 37.0480N 76.2971W
188 McAllen Texas 136,639 129,877 5.21% 48.3 sq mi 2,687 per sq mi 26.2185N 98.2461W
189 Warren Michigan 134,873 134,056 0.61% 34.4 sq mi 3,899 per sq mi 42.4929N 83.0250W
190 Bellevue Washington 133,992 122,363 9.50% 32.0 sq mi 3,828 per sq mi 47.5978N 122.1565W
191 West Valley City Utah 133,579 129,480 3.17% 35.6 sq mi 3,642 per sq mi 40.6885N 112.0118W
192 Columbia South Carolina 133,358 129,272 3.16% 132.2 sq mi 978 per sq mi 34.0298N 80.8966W
193 Olathe Kansas 131,885 125,872 4.78% 59.7 sq mi 2,110 per sq mi 38.8843N 94.8188W
194 Sterling Heights Michigan 131,224 129,699 1.18% 36.5 sq mi 3,553 per sq mi 42.5812N 83.0303W
195 New Haven Connecticut 130,660 129,779 0.68% 18.7 sq mi 6,948 per sq mi 41.3108N 72.9250W
196 Miramar Florida 130,288 122,041 6.76% 29.5 sq mi 4,134 per sq mi 25.9770N 80.3358W