Sectors

 

If we have a common vision, are we all pulling in the same direction? 

Do funders make it easy to provide fidelity for the program or add more hoops to jump through?

Do we care more about the results of the child or of the program?

With so many programs and initiatives, how do we divide our work into sectors to know if everything necessary is include?

How do we know if there are any gaps?

Who is accountable for the work being done?

 


 

 

http://newdirectionsct.org/ 


Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review.[2] Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms "physiological", "safety", "belongingness" and "love", "esteem", "self-actualization", and "self-transcendence" to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through.

Maslow studied what he called exemplary people such as Albert Einstein, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Frederick Douglass rather than mentally ill or neurotic people, writing that "the study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy."[3] Maslow studied the healthiest 1% of the college student population.[4]

Maslow's theory was fully expressed in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality.[5] The hierarchy remains a very popular framework in sociology research, management training[6] and secondary and higher psychology instruction.

 

 


 

Maple Street School - Community School

 

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES – SIX COMPONENTS
1- Health

  • Dental Clinics
  • Health Screenings
  •     Vision
  •     Hearing
  •     Wellness visits
  • Referrals to specialists

2- Mental Health

  • Individual counseling for students
  • Family counseling
  • Support groups
  •     MindUp Social/Emotional
  •     Skills Group*
  •     Anti-Bullying Groups 

3- Youth Development/Out-of-School Time


Homework assistance

Academic Assistance/Enrichment

  •     French Club
  •     Science Club

Sports/Fitness/Health activities

  •     Fitness Club
  •     Gymnastics
  •     Basketball
  •     Volleyball
  •     Karate
  •     Wrestling
  •     Baseball
  •     Softball


Art activities

  •     Music - Hip Hop, Jazz, Glee Club, Breakdancing, Ballet
  •     Art - Drawing/Painting, Arts & Crafts

Girl and Boy Scouts / Other groups

  •         Girls Group Boy Scouts
  •         Good News Club

Other Activities: 

  • Chess Cooking 
  • Vernon Reads
  • 4H Talking with TJ (conflict resolution, teamwork, wii fit, gardening)
  • Mentoring - Limited currently – working on expanding to C.O. and community members
  • Dinner – averaging 20-25 students per evening


4- Lifelong Learning (MULTI-GENERATIONAL)

Adult Education classes

  •     GED classes 


5- Parent Enrichment/Engagement

  • Parenting Education classes (through DCF and/or Family Resource Center) - 
        Parenting for Out of Control Adolescents
  • Literacy Nights
  • Family Support Team 

6- Community Engagement (Partnerships; RCA Union Church)

  • Clothing Bank
  • Student events
  • Spring Fair
  • Book Mobile
  • Community Garden
  • Community events

 

Multidisciplinary 
cross-sector

Reaching their full potential
All domains
1) social
2) emotional
3) intellectual
4) language
5) physical

 

1st three years 


http://www.communitiesinschools.org   Communities in Schools

Categories

 

 


 

http://humanservices.alberta.ca/disability-services/pdd-poi.html

The Quality of Life Framework

The My Life: Personal Outcomes Index™ is one way for PDD to measure personal outcomes for the adults with developmental disabilities that PDD funds. It is a survey that profiles how individuals feel about their quality of life in eight different domains. The domains are grouped into three factors:

  • Well-being
emotional; material; physical
  • Independence
personal development; self-determination
  • Social Participation
interpersonal relations; social inclusion; rights

FACTORS and DOMAINS

Emotional
Well-Being
  • Contentment
  • Self-Concept
Material
Well-Being
  • Financial Status
  • Housing
  • Employment
Physical
Well-Being
  • Health
  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Leisure
Personal Development
  • Education
  • Personal Skill
  • Competence
  • Performance
Self-Determination
  • Autonomy & Personal Control
  • Goals & Personal Values
  • Choice
Interpersonal Relations
  • Interactions
  • Relationships
  • Supports
Social Inclusion
  • Community Integration & Participation
  • Community Roles
  • Social Supports
Rights
  • Human
  • Legal

Schalock, R.L. & Verdugo, M.A., 2002

DOMAIN descriptions

  • Emotional well being: happiness and safety, and how individuals feel about their life
  • Interpersonal relations: type of support and help individuals get, relationships with family and friends, and the types of activities that individuals do with people in their life
  • Social inclusion: the activities and things individuals do and would like to do in the community, the people individuals do things with and places they go in their community
  • Personal development: the things that individuals are interested in learning about, and things that they enjoy and are important to them
  • Self-determination: the choices and decisions individuals make about areas that matter to them in their life
  • Physical well-being: energy levels, being able to get medical help, health and lifestyle
  • Material well-being: personal possessions that are important to individuals, how much individuals can use money for things they want or need
  • Rights: individuals? right to privacy, how individuals are treated by people, how much individuals are listened to
Created:
Modified: 2012-09-25
PID: 15037

 

Hunger, Housing,  Health, Education, Employment, Transportation, Socio-Emotional-Spiritual, Art & Culture


http://cecp.air.org/default.asp 

 

Issue Areas

Child Welfare

Cultural Competence

Families

Juvenile Justice

Mental Health

School Violence Prevention and Intervention

Schools and Special Education

Alternative Schools

 


 

 

 

We continually talk about data being so important and RBA as being the best approach for understanding our situation.

What data do we collect and utilize wisely.

Why does each community need to seek their own data?

And, why is it often several years old already?

Why don’t we provide each person a unique Identifier number and if not their Social Security number, is another needed?

In the communities with increasing poverty, education become inherently more difficult to deliver to the consumer of such services. What entities should be involved in the process to be partners for solutions?

CT has the largest Achievement Gap, How do our lowest performing and highest performing “marks” compare to other states?

In other words, is the gap so large because our best are that much better or our lowest performers so low? Or ___________

How were the 30 lowest performing school Districts chosen?  They appear to be in almost complete correlation to the levels of poverty. 

Then, in each district, is it true that the level of performance correlates to the income level of each school?

If they do have a direct correlation, are there any anomalies that should then be looked at to see how they break the pattern?

If certain towns, or only sections of towns are hit so hard with poverty, what responsibility if any does the remainder of the town or the region have in helping resolve issues that hurt others?

If certain towns, or only sections of towns are hit so hard with poverty, why would anyone want to live there in the first place?

What if any is the difference about who moves to a depressed town, or only sections of town, a neighborhood.  Does it have to do with income level, race, education level????

 


 

 

Whole Child is not another program, but a philosophy that uses strategic planning, web-based technology, performance measurement and broad-based community engagement to build communities where everyone works together to make sure children thrive.


Individually, many agencies and organizations serve one dimension of children’s well-being, from immunizations to educational programs. Embracing the idea that we must nurture the Whole Child requires the entire community working together. A child who is fully immunized but spends the day without stimulating educational experiences will not realize his full potential. Similarly, a child who has quality child care, but an unsafe home environment may never become all she could be. Ultimately, our community needs to fully nurture the treasure that is our children.


At Whole Child, we view services and programs as a continuum of care, not as isolated services. It’s this holistic approach to addressing care that makes all the difference in achieving positive outcomes.


The Whole Child philosophy is grounded in the notion that communities must address all six dimensions of children’s well being to raise healthy children:


•    Physical and Mental Health
•    Quality Education
•    Social-Emotional Development
•    Spiritual Foundation and Strength
•    Safe and Nurturing Environment
•    Economic Stability

 

Visit: www.wholechildirc.org to learn more about Whole Child Indian River and to complete a Whole Child Profile!

 

For more information, please click on the links below:

Whole Child Presentation

Whole Child Information

 


* Physical and Mental Health

* Quality Education and Development

* Social-Emotional Development

* Spiritual Foundation and Strength

* Safe and Nurturing Environment

* Economic Stability

Adult Education

Alternative Education

Adult Health

Child Abuse Prevention

Child Care

Youth Organizations

Child Health

Community Activities

Cultural and the Arts

Community Activities

Faith Based, Religious Community Activities

Mentoring Community Activities

Parks and Recreation Community Activities

Volunteering

Community Support Groups

Counseling

Dentists

Developmental Disabilities Screening

Developmental Screening

Domestic Violence Prevention

Drug, Alcohol, or Substance Abuse Emergency Services

Clothing Emergency Services

Food Emergency Services

Other Emergency Services

Shelter

Employment Assistance

Family Literacy

Family Practice / Internists

Financial Counseling

Hearing Screening

Housing

Immunizations

Infant / Child Mental Health Screening

Mental Health Services

Neighborhood Crime Watch

Nutritional Guidance

Parenting Education

Pediatricians

Prenatal Care

Safety

School Readiness

Speech Language Evaluation and Other Therapies

Transportation

Vision Screening

 

 


 

From CAHS

Food

Cash Assistance

Housing

Energy Assistance

Jobs

Adult Education

Money Management

Homeownership

Health Care

Mental Health &

Addiction

AIDS

Specialized Health

Services

Child Care

Family Supports

Multi Service

Elderly

Disabled

Veterans

Foreign Born

Legal Questions


http://uwgnh.org/sites/default/files/Boost%20Directory%20FINAL12.28.10.pdf

 

Table of Contents

SECTION 1: EXTENDED LEARNING AND ENRICHMENT

PROGRAMS

After School Programs .......................................................................................................................................................................... 3

College Preparatory Programs .......................................................................................................................................................... 12

Computer Classes ................................................................................................................................................................................ 13

Employment ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 14

Leadership Development .................................................................................................................................................................... 16

Life Skills Education .............................................................................................................................................................................. 18

Mentoring ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 19

Museums ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20

Public Preschool Programs ................................................................................................................................................................. 22

Special Education .................................................................................................................................................................................. 24

Summer Programs ................................................................................................................................................................................ 28

Tutoring/Homework Help ................................................................................................................................................................. 34

SECTION 2: PHYSICAL HEALTH

Asthma ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36

Autism...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36

Community Health Clinics ................................................................................................................................................................. 37

Contraception ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 40

Dental Care ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 42

Diabetes .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 43

Eye Care .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 44

HIV/AIDS Care & Sexually Transmitted Disease ......................................................................................................................... 45

Immunizations ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 48

Lead Poisoning ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 50

Nutrition ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 52

Prenatal & Postpartum Care/Counseling ........................................................................................................................................ 54

School-Based Health Centers ............................................................................................................................................................ 58

SECTION 3: EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Adolescent/Youth Counseling ........................................................................................................................................................... 59

Child Abuse Counseling/Prevention ................................................................................................................................................ 66

Domestic Violence Counseling/Prevention ................................................................................................................................... 68

General Counseling .............................................................................................................................................................................. 70

Substance Abuse Counseling ............................................................................................................................................................. 78

SECTION 4: FAMILY SUPPORT

Adult Education ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 85

Benefits Assistance ............................................................................................................................................................................... 86

Child Abuse and/or Neglect .............................................................................................................................................................. 91

Child Support Services ........................................................................................................................................................................ 92

Clothing/Diapers/Toys ........................................................................................................................................................................ 93

Community Centers ............................................................................................................................................................................ 98

Employment ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 100

English as a Second Language ........................................................................................................................................................... 106

Family Resource Centers .................................................................................................................................................................. 109

Food Pantries & Soup Kitchens ....................................................................................................................................................... 111

Foster Children/Adoptive Families Support ................................................................................................................................ 122

Group Homes ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 124

Housing.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 125

Immigrant Services ............................................................................................................................................................................. 129

Legal Services ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 130

Parent/Child Activities ....................................................................................................................................................................... 132

Parenting Support ............................................................................................................................................................................... 133

Shelters .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 144

 

 



K–12

Improve Test Scores
Parent Engagement
Educating Boys
Getting Ahead for Parents
Events & Resources
What People Are Saying
Our Consultants
View All

Higher Education

Student Retention
Preparing for Careers
Investigations Program
Events & Resources
Results and Best Practices
What People Are Saying
Our Consultants

FAQs

Community

Removing Barriers
Community Sustainability
Getting Ahead
Events & Resources
Results and Best Practices
What People Are Saying
Our Consultants
FAQs

Criminal Justice

Improving Outcomes
Getting Ahead for Offenders
Events & Resources
Results and Best Practices
Our Consultants

FAQs

Health and Healthcare

Improving Outcomes
Getting Ahead for Staff
Events & Resources
Results & Best Practices
Our Consultants
FAQs

Business

Engaging Employees
Getting Ahead for Employees
Events & Resources
Results and Best Practices
What People Are Saying
Our Consultants
FAQs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Poverty 101

What does it mean to leave no child behind? What does it mean to be from poverty and go to school in America? Through sharing her journey out of generational poverty, findings from her doctoral research on generational poverty, successful completion of a Bachelor's degree, and fifteen years of working in schools struggling with educating students from poverty, Donna Beegle frames the discussion of how to successfully engage students and families from generational poverty in the education process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the impact and meaning of education for students from generational poverty
  • Understand how poverty in the U.S. is internalized as a personal deficiency
  • Understand how to develop a welcoming climate and meaningful curriculum for students
    from poverty backgrounds
  • Explain the difference between immigrant poverty and poverty in the U.S.
  • Discuss the confounding of race and class issues in developing strategies for educating students from poverty
  • Explain the barriers perceived by people in poverty when dealing with educators
  • Understand how to implement changes in communication, teaching and learning styles to enhance education success for students from poverty
  • Discuss ways to motivate and provide meaningful incentives to students from poverty backgrounds
  • Understand how to connect in meaningful ways to redefine the meaning and value of education
  • Explain how to frame education goals from the perspective of students and families from poverty

 

 


http://www.combarriers.com/about 

Our Mission:

Communication Across Barriers is dedicated to broadening and improving opportunities for people who live in the war zone of poverty
Our far reaching goals:

  • Assist communities and organizations to “fight poverty, not the people who live in it.” We illuminate real and structural causes of poverty and provide life changing information that shatters common myths and stereotypes about people who live in poverty
  • Offer research-based strategies and insider perspectives for improving relationships, communication, and opportunities across poverty barriers
  • Develop an army of speakers and trainers who can educate and assist communities in breaking poverty barriers
  • Provide models and programs that increase a connected, collaborative, community-wide approach to fighting poverty
  • Educate and engage people not in poverty with tools and avenues for making a difference in their own communities

 

 


Educating Students: Building Blocks from A-Z

A

Assessment—Link meaningful assessment to rigorous curriculum and instruction. All three areas must be examined for being inclusive of different learning styles. Feedback from assessment should also be well thought out.

B

Buildings—Create safe, clean buildings and grounds; and provide up-to-date textbooks, equipment and materials.

C

Collaborative Work—Learn about other community groups/people who work for the success of families in generational poverty and seek out ways to work collaboratively with them.

D

Diverse Teachers—Hire a diverse group of teachers who can identify with students based on common knowledge and experiences, and teachers who meet students where they are and help them get to where they want and need to be.

E

Evaluations—Regularly evaluate and assess teachers, staff, administrators based on criteria related to their knowledge of and understanding about the issues surrounding students from poverty, and their ability to work with these students.

F

Field Trips—Increase student’s exposure to possibilities by taking them on field trips, bringing in outside speakers, and providing other experiential learning opportunities. Ensure opportunities for extracurricular activities at no cost.

G

Generational Poverty—Broaden the definitions of “multicultural” and “cultural competency” to include generational poverty or social class. This can be called, “socio-cultural” competency to encompass socio-economic factors affecting the educational process.

H

High Clear Expectations—Expect all kids to learn. Students from generational poverty report an overwhelming sense that teachers do not believe in them. Make sure this can’t be said of your school or your teachers.

I

Involvement—Create family involvement by focusing on common ground (i.e. we love your child, you love your child, what can you tell us about your child, here’s what we—educators—have learned about your child, etc.). When the focus is on education, parents may have little or no positive experiences to connect and relate with educators.

J

Judgment and Assumptions—Suspend judgment and assumptions about families to promote educational success.

K

Know the Students—Ensure low teacher, staff, and administrator turnover to allow for relationship development. As much as possible, use staff or administrators who “KNOW” the students as substitutes to avoid interrupting their learning.

L

Literacy—Employ literacy approaches that include understanding of Oral Culture. They will be most effective with students from poverty. Oral culture is linked to poverty across race lines. People in poverty get their primary information from other people, not books. This shapes how they think and trains the brain to operate in very specific ways.

M

Motivation—Recognize that motivation differs between social classes. Motivation to achieve in education is generally based on the assumption that there is a “value” in education. Most people living in poverty have never had a meaningful relationship with someone who has benefited from the educational system. BE that relationship for one of your students and share with them the value that education has given you…and that can be available to them.

N

Novelty—Include entertainment in your curriculum and activities. Entertainment is often used as a way to escape the harsh world of poverty. Novelty should be part of the entertainment. Include unusual, touchable materials, such as toothpicks, marshmallows, and play dough to increase focus and interest.

O

Open Doors of Opportunity—Create successful mentor programs by encouraging mentors to use their network and social capital to open doors of opportunity for their students and to help the students create their own network of support.

P

Professional Development—Include knowledge and best practices on educating students from generational poverty in your professional development activities. Provide immersion opportunities such as home visits.

Q

Quality Student-to-Student Relationships — Create opportunities in the classroom for the development of student-to-student relationships to build better understanding of the experiences of the different social classes.

R

Relationships—Change the lives for students from generational poverty by building caring, nurturing relationships with them. Learn to be bi-cultural—meaning that you are comfortable maneuvering middle-class systems (such as educational systems).

S

School Culture and Climate—Develop a school culture/climate in which learning can occur with the principal playing the key leadership role and modeling socio-culturally competent behavior.

T

Teaching and Communication Styles—Provide a variety of teaching and communication styles including concrete, experiential, and oral culture styles.

U

Understanding—Create the expectations that all staff, administrators, and teachers have an understanding of the structural causes of poverty, an understanding of what the experiences of generational poverty area like, knowledge of current best practices for educating across generational poverty barriers, and zero tolerance for low expectations and judgments of students living in poverty.

V

Vision—Create a shared vision with students from generational poverty about what education can mean.

W

Wider Community—Include the wider community in efforts to educate students from generational poverty. School staff, teachers and administrators need “full resource backpacks.”

X

eXamine and Define Poverty—Discuss poverty openly in the school and in the classroom to reduce class/status issues between students. Educational efforts to raise consciousness about race issues can serve as a model for increasing awareness about poverty related barriers in the educational environment.

Y

Youth Matters—Do everything you can to keep class size low and be able to focus on the young people in the classroom. Assign specialty teachers to the classrooms, bring in community help, use administrator expertise, Title I funds, etc. Be creative.

Z

Zero Gaps—Ensure smooth transitions between assignments, classes, and grades. Maintain as many connections as possible and link students to new mentors who can help them in their new endeavor.

 


 

Poverty Institute

Hands On Two Day Poverty Institute

Check Schedule

This interactive two-day session provides professionals and community members with a deeper understanding of poverty and offers concrete tools for breaking poverty barriers. Participants become skilled in communicating and working more effectively with people who live in the crisis of poverty.

All Institutes are led by internationally recognized expert, Dr. Donna M. Beegle. Dr. Beegle frames the discussion of how to provide authentic opportunities for people to move out of and stay out of poverty. During the Poverty Institute, she shares her journey from generational poverty to achieving a Doctorate, research findings from the perspectives of people living in poverty, and 18 years of working with professionals and communities at home and abroad.

Attendees will:

  • Learn to communicate more effectively with those living in poverty (e.g., tools for bridging print culture and oral culture).
  • Use role play, activities, modeling and dialogue to understand and practice the core concepts.
  • Come away with concrete strategies and materials for immediate use in making a difference for those you serve.

Sample Poverty Institute Agenda

Day One

 

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the impact of poverty on self-confidence, motivation, and expectations.
  • Understand how poverty in the U.S. is internalized as a personal deficiency.
  • Describe social class differences in priorities, language, and relationships.
  • Understand how to develop a welcoming environment and develop meaningful relationships.
  • Explain the difference between immigrant poverty and poverty in the U.S.
  • Discuss the confounding of race and poverty issues to better assist people in moving forward.
  • Explain the barriers perceived by people in poverty when dealing with those not in poverty.
  • Understand how to implement changes in communication, teaching, and learning styles to enhance connections and success.
  • Discuss ways to motivate and provide meaningful incentives to people fighting poverty.
  • Demonstrate ability to build a “full resource backpack” for assisting people to move out and stay out of poverty.

Day Two

Day two of the Poverty Institute provides participants with strategies for communicating and relating more effectively with people living in poverty. The concepts of oral and print culture communication and relationship styles are offered as tools to enhance skills necessary for educating and communicating effectively across poverty barriers. Participants will role-play and practice different communication and relationship styles to improve connections for breaking poverty barriers.

Learning Objectives

  • Obtain techniques for understanding and valuing oral and print culture communication styles.
  • Understand how to focus and build on the assets of oral culture students and families instead of only seeing problems.
  • Understand how to include oral culture learning styles in programs, policy, and curriculum.
  • Explain how to overcome misunderstanding that can arise when diverse communication and learning styles are present.
  • Discuss why oral culture orientation is a main determinant of poverty.
  • Describe how to assist people in gaining print culture skills necessary to be successful in education and the workplace.
  • Evaluate programs, curriculum, and school climate for inclusiveness of oral culture communicators.

 


 

Poverty 101: Teaching about Poverty and Inequality

Strategies and resources for instructors developing college-level courses and lessons about poverty and inequality. These presentations were developed for IRP's inaugural Teaching Poverty 101 Workshop.

Introductory Commentary

Poverty 101 Workshop Group Picture

The Rise and Fall of Poverty as a Policy Issue
Thomas Corbett, UW–Madison

Poverty: The Concept and its Measurement and Study

Perspectives on Measuring Poverty in the United States
Robert Haveman and Timothy Smeeding, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Who Is Poor in the U.S. and Across Nations, How Poor, and What Are the Trends?
Geoffrey Wallace, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Approaches to the Study of Poverty
Daniel Meyer (with Robert Haveman), UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

The Causes of Poverty

The Causes of American Poverty, an Overview: Labor Market, Family Structure, Racial Discrimination, and Culture
Robert Haveman, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

The Labor Market and its Role in Poverty/Inequality Growth
Timothy Smeeding, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Self-Sufficiency, Assets, and Poverty
J. Michael Collins, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Undergraduate and Professional Poverty Education Beyond 101: A Consortium Approach
Harlan Beckley, Washington and Lee University
PowerPoint Presentation

Impact of Anti-Poverty Programs in the United States
John Karl Scholz, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Health Policy and the Poor
Barbara Wolfe, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Qualitative Approaches and the Role of Public Policy in Reducing Poverty

The Use of Qualitative Research to Understand the Lives of the Poor
David Pate, UW–Milwaukee, (including presentation of a service learning component, or community-based research project [with Matissa Hollister, Dartmouth College])
PowerPoint Presentation

Family Structure, Poverty, and Inequality
Marcia Carlson, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

The Politics of Poverty
Thomas Oliver, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Telling the Poverty Story...to journalists and others
Sandra Shea, Philadelphia Daily News

Predicting the Benefits of Anti-Poverty Policies
David Weimer, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Early Childhood Experience and Poverty
Katherine Magnuson, UW–Madison
PowerPoint Presentation

Roundtable: What Issues Will Dominate the Poverty Debate Over the Next Decade?
Maria Cancian, Thomas Corbett, and Jennifer Noyes, UW–Madison

Syllabi Developed by Poverty 101 Workshop Participants

Please also see this collection of poverty-related course syllabi from classes taught by participants in the Poverty 101 Workshop.


Hands-On Solutions

Helping children, adults, and the communities they live in to thrive is what aha! Process is all about. We have an array of proven programs based on our proprietary Resource Builder Model that provide a comprehensive approach to improving outcomes for institutions and individuals. Each program starts by creating an understanding of the dynamics that cause and perpetuate poverty and then delivers concrete tools and solutions for building resources and overcoming the barriers to success that poverty creates.

Let us help you make a difference. Call today at (800) 424-9484 or request information online.

Explore our hands-on solutions:

K–12: Our flagship model, A Framework for Understanding Poverty, has helped hundreds of thousands of teachers and administrators to better engage students and parents to create more successful outcomes.

Higher Education: College Achievement Alliance provides solutions to colleges and universities looking to improve academic outcomes for low-income and first-generation college students.

Communities: Bridges Out of Poverty has assisted tens of thousands of people in communities around the world. We help you gain insight and strategies for preventing, reducing, and alleviating poverty with concrete tools, structures, and knowledge for building a healthy, sustainable community.

Getting Ahead: Getting Ahead in a Just-Gettin’-By World, our curriculum for under-resourced individuals, has helped tens of thousands of people in poverty create their own plan for stability.

Criminal Justice: Criminal justice systems around the country leverage our program to strengthen the community, save taxpayer dollars, and reduce recidivism.

Healthcare: Bridges into Health’s  strategies use the lens of economic class to improve access, availability, cost, and value in individual health and population health.

Businesses: Our solutions help address common issues seen in large, entry-level workforces to generate solid return on investment. Unlike other models, our solutions use the lens of economic class to help build employee resources and your business’s bottom line.

Want results? Call (800) 424-9484 or request information online.

 

The Resource Builder Model includes workshops, books/products, and ongoing support that were created as an end-to-end approach to help all aspects of a community to build a stronger, sustainable community by reducing poverty.

The model’s proven strategies and tools improve outcomes whether you are an educator, community leader, business professional, health professional, social worker, first responder, government employee, or criminal justice system employee.

Primary Components of the Model

  1. Understanding Poverty
    • Uses research based on the causes of economic class to create a non-political approach
    • Provides a practical model (conceptual framework, common language, interventions, and tools) to increase individuals’ resources and outcomes
    • Provides a model that is adaptable, can be integrated into existing programs, and changes paradigms
  2. Developing Resources
    • Focuses on 9 different resources
    • Provides tested tools for developing resources/creating stability of resources which leads to greater capacity at the individual, institutional, and community levels
  3. Engaging the community
    • Develops resources on three levels to address poverty: individual, institutional, and community/policy
    • Engages people from all economic backgrounds at all three levels for a systemic approach to building resources through innovating and sharing knowledge
    • Builds relationships of mutual respect between and among people in poverty, middle class, and wealth
  4. Evaluating and improving on a continuous basis
    • Develops strategies that work, embeds them into daily routines, and shares them with partners around the globe to develop resources that lessen poverty
    • Supports and expands the model through measurement, compilation of data of results, research analysis, and consultation with communities of practice

The components of the Resource Builder Model form the foundation for each of our individual training areas:

Each program includes tools, training, and ongoing support to help individuals, institutions, and communities develop resources that create stability and sustainability.

 

Hands-On Solutions

Helping children, adults, and the communities they live in to thrive is what aha! Process is all about. We have an array of proven programs based on our proprietary Resource Builder Model that provide a comprehensive approach to improving outcomes for institutions and individuals. Each program starts by creating an understanding of the dynamics that cause and perpetuate poverty and then delivers concrete tools and solutions for building resources and overcoming the barriers to success that poverty creates.

Let us help you make a difference. Call today at (800) 424-9484 or request information online.

Explore our hands-on solutions:

K–12: Our flagship model, A Framework for Understanding Poverty, has helped hundreds of thousands of teachers and administrators to better engage students and parents to create more successful outcomes.

Higher Education: College Achievement Alliance provides solutions to colleges and universities looking to improve academic outcomes for low-income and first-generation college students.

Communities: Bridges Out of Poverty has assisted tens of thousands of people in communities around the world. We help you gain insight and strategies for preventing, reducing, and alleviating poverty with concrete tools, structures, and knowledge for building a healthy, sustainable community.

Getting Ahead: Getting Ahead in a Just-Gettin’-By World, our curriculum for under-resourced individuals, has helped tens of thousands of people in poverty create their own plan for stability.

Criminal Justice: Criminal justice systems around the country leverage our program to strengthen the community, save taxpayer dollars, and reduce recidivism.

Healthcare: Bridges into Health’s  strategies use the lens of economic class to improve access, availability, cost, and value in individual health and population health.

Businesses: Our solutions help address common issues seen in large, entry-level workforces to generate solid return on investment. Unlike other models, our solutions use the lens of economic class to help build employee resources and your business’s bottom line.

Want results? Call (800) 424-9484 or request information online.

 


 

Poverty, Values, and Why I Don’t Like Ruby Payne

I have training as a philosopher, but I pay my bills through my employment at a Community Action Program, working with the homeless.  Unsurprisingly, working on the practical side of a field in which one has lots of theoretical understanding can be as frustrating as it is rewarding.  I certainly wouldn’t expect any of my coworkers to be able to summarize Rawls’ Difference Principle (let alone trace the connection between A Theory of Justice, Johnson’s Great Society, and the subsequent CAPs that were a result of the Economic Opportunity Act), but their lack of interest in foundational issues in economics, politics, and ethics sometimes shocks me.  Recently, I had an especially polarizing experience with my co-workers when I was required to sit through the Bridges out of Poverty workshop, based upon the book, A Framework for Understanding Poverty, by Ruby Payne.

If you are not involved in social work, you may be unfamiliar with the work of Ruby Payne, which is primarily based upon anecdotal observations about the "hidden rules" of social class.  Despite the fact that Dr. Payne’s "research" is widely dismissed even by sociologists for its lack of methodological rigor, the revelation that poor people have different attitudes about food from rich people appears to be profoundly enlightening to some people, at least if anecdotal observations of my co-workers is any in indication (maybe I should write a book).  To be fair, the Bridges Out of Poverty program is well-intentioned, at least as far as I can tell.  Though after a seven-hour workshop I was still unable to identify a single explicit foundational principle or specific directive, the implicit theme seemed to be that people in different classes see the world differently, and the general directive seemed to be that we should be sensitive to that fact in our work with the indigent.

The polarizing moment came when talk moved to values. After spending the better part of a morning listing less-than-revelatory observations about how poor people view violence, bedtimes, school performance, and other aspects of everyday life, the speaker cautioned us that these views were not good or bad and the program was only meant to inform us about the different ways in which people in different classes view the same issues.  I raised my hand and commented that this seemed like a bit of an exaggeration.  "Surely," I said, "we can appreciate that a person living in the inner city has reasons to fight or sell drugs, and we can still make a value judgment about why that behavior is bad."  I was met with polite nods, but nobody seemed to appreciate that my comment was a subtle criticism of the myopic relativism of the program.  I tried again after lunch.  The speaker said explicitly that we were not there to make judgments about the values of the different classes, only to learn something by observing their differences.  This time I was more explicit.  "But, surely," I blurted out, "we all know that this program and the work that we do is biased toward the values of the middle class.  I mean, we may understand why poor people don’t value education the way middle class people do, but we still make a judgment that education is valuable, and we push that value to our clients."

This time I was met with blank stares.  Several of the other participants volunteered less-than-useful responses which belied the fact that they really didn’t understand my point.  Each response was some version of,  "But, poor people really do want the same things as middle class people, they just don’t have the tools/knowledge/resources to achieve those things!"  After succeeding in annoying everyone in the room, I waited until break to take up the issue privately with the speaker who nodded sympathetically when I explained that debate about the empirical effectiveness of different means to the same end is not the same thing as a genuine difference of values.  "Insofar as there is a genuine disagreement about values, I don’t think that any reconciliation is possible," I said, "But, don’t get me wrong.  I think most people value similar things, which is why outreach programs are useful.  We aren’t teaching people to value different things, we’re teaching them better means to their ends."  Again, I was met with a blank stare, but, perhaps believing I agreed with her, she nodded and walked away.

As I tried to explain to my coworkers, my objection to the Bridges Out of Poverty program is not an objection to the implicit middle-class value judgments that give social work its motivating force.   For the most part, I share the same values as my coworkers, and I share the intuition that most of the practices that we push through education and outreach are attractive to our clients precisely because they share those values as well.  (Of course, this is another way of saying that I don’t really believe that class plays a major role in determining values in this first place.)  My objection is to the absurd and contradictory combination of explicitly stated relativism and implicitly assumed objectivity that is pervasive in the work of Ruby Payne and the people who follow her.   And, it maddens me that so many people in social work seem to miss this rather simple point:  Either values are objective, or they are not.  If values are objective, then they are not relative to class.  Also, if values are objective, then there is a fact of the matter about how people should behave, and we absolutely can and should make judgments upon people who fail to promote objective values.  If values are not objective, then it is silly to argue about them.  The only discussion worth having is about which actions are more efficient means to the promotion of values, not about the values themselves.

Though I find the contradiction between explicit relativism and implicit value objectivity worrisome, I have a pretty good guess about why it is so pervasive in my field.  On almost every level, education and outreach work is based upon the assumption that the poor have some control over their poverty.  Political activists can organize strikes, mobilize voters, and publicly denounce economic policies that create and maintain class disparity.  Social workers take on clients who have very few resources and try to improve their condition by giving them information alone.  We may privately believe that poverty persists because of huge variation in the distribution of political and economic power which will never be altered by changes in individual behavior, but our job is to reassure people that they will be able to get out of poverty if they work hard, follow the rules, and take advantage of the meager resources provided by public welfare programs.   Unfortunately, the belief that hard work and education will get you out of poverty implies that individuals who aren’t getting out of poverty are either not working hard enough or are ignorant about the resources available to them. It’s a hard truth, and nobody wants to admit it, but discussions about why different classes value different things are pointless.  The discussion we need to have is about why different classes have different things.  Community Action Programs like mine were founded upon a very simple, value-driven principle:  Poverty is a bad thing.   We don’t need a framework for understanding it.  We need practical strategies for ending it.


 

The Guiding Coalition is a representative group that includes people from all economic classes and races who are committed to building their community and ending poverty in Summit County.  The Guiding Coalition is responsible for Bridges Out of Poverty and Circles implementation and assures it is a
high-impact strategy that changes the mind set of the community. The Guiding Coalition determines the focus and plan of action for the elimination of barriers that are brought forth by individual Circles at the Big View Meeting and oversees program operations and resource distributions.

Commitment:
The Guiding Coalition meets the 3rd Wednesday of every month from 5:30-7:30pm. During this time, we have dinner together and then break out into our 5 teams. On the Guiding Coalition, most all of the work is done in teams. At the end of the night, we all come together to share what each team is working on and give feedback to each other. We would ask you to join a team and come to our meetings each month.

Teams:
Recruitment Team- Plans BOP workshops/volunteer training, recruits Guiding Coalition members/Allies, and builds awareness in community.

Big View Team- Gathers community to identify, discuss, and address community barriers to getting out of poverty.

Resource Team- Develops and maintains a comprehensive funding plan, working with funders and resource development.

Economic Stability Team - Builds social capital to education and employment opportunities in the community.

Community Team - Plans the Circles meetings that take place every Wednesday night, including food, childcare, and speakers.

Each team has a chair and co-chair that lead the group.  These positions are still open and much needed!

For more information Please contact Bridges at BridgesSummit@gmail.com or call 330-760-3488.

View Flyer

 

 


 

From 2020

Art, Culture, Tourism

 

             

BASIC NEEDS

       

Sectors

Faith Family Education Safety Personal Safety   Health
Having a Medical Home
Housing    Employment Transportation Culture Business   Government

 

  Fatherlessness  

Crime

 

 

Bullying

Sexual Abuse

 

  Dental Behavioral/Mental Physical Utilities Job Creation   Media     Military

 

     

Incarcerated parents

Gang participation

Narcotics trafficking

Sex trafficking

 

      Counseling

Therapy

Prevention

Exercise
Healthy diet
Check-Ups
Screenings

Recreation

Sports teams

Homelessness Childcare   Issues of Race     Advocacy 

 

    Achievement Gap           Environmental   Workforce training   Profiling     Legislation

 

    Underachieving schools           Nutrition

Healthy

Breastfeeding

 

((The best social service program is a JOB!)

Unemployment rates

Under
Employment

  R      

 

    Attendance           Food security   Poverty          

 

    Behavior           Hunger   Need for skilled labor          

 

    School Climate                          

 

    Bullying             Transit-Oriented Development, (TOD)   Transit-Oriented Development, (TOD)         

 

    Remediation at Community Colleges                          

 

    Social promotion                          

 

                               

 

                               

 

                Environmental              

 

                               

Seniors

                               

9     From Hope Lives (page 92) (add transportation  BF)

• Economic. This is the one everyone thinks of when they think of poverty—not

enough money. In many urban areas of developing nations, there are few jobs that

provide adequate income for unskilled labor. More than 1 billion people—one in

five—live on less than $1 per day.

• Education. Education equals opportunity, and without it, many stay trapped in the

cycle of poverty. When education is present, people gain confidence and learn skills

to become self-sustaining.

• Health. Many don’t have the knowledge to keep themselves healthy and lack the

resources to take care of themselves when they become ill. For example, one of the

world’s biggest killers is diarrhea. Mothers who haven’t been educated otherwise

stop giving water to children with diarrhea—thinking they have too much water in

them. The children die of dehydration. Measles is still a leading cause of death in

children, even though a safe vaccine has been available for 40 years. Malaria kills 1

million children each year, even though a bed net treated with insecticide that costs

just $10 could save them.

• Environment. Each year, over 5 million children die from illnesses and other conditions

caused by their environments. For example, 40 million people in Indonesia don’t

have access to safe drinking water, and contaminated water is one of the sources of

one of the world’s leading killers, diarrhea.

• Social. A culture or government that devalues humans deepens poverty. Child soldiers,

child trafficking, a lack of education for women, unfair work practices—all are

symptoms of unjust social structures and reinforce poverty.

• Spiritual. Few of us think of spirituality when we think of poverty, but the truth is

you can be economically wealthy and spiritually poor. Poverty is a spiritual issue.

Spiritual darkness causes much of the sin that creates poverty, the despair that compounds

it, and our own inaction in the face of it.


Waterbury’s

Waterbury’s Community Youth Resource Guide - August, 2013

www.waterburybridgetosuccess.org/files/4113/7530/6239/Youth_Resource_Guide_August_2013_alpha.pdf 

********************************************************

Name and phone number of person providing the information below:

NAME                 PHONE

 

1. AGENCY AND SITE DATA REGISTRATION

(Fill one of these out for each site.)

Agency Name

Site Name (if different than agency name):

Address:

Mailing Address (if different than street address)

Phone Numbers:

Fax Number:

Is there a TTY Number?

Director Name and Title:

Hours: Service hours, if different:

Email address: Web site address:

What languages are spoken at this site?

 

2. SERVICE INFORMATION

(Fill one of these out for each service that the agency offers.)

Service description

Who is eligible for this service?

What is the specific area served for this service? (List the towns or the region.)

Is there a specific age range or gender that this service is for?

Is there a fee? Set fee, Sliding fee, Nominal fee, or No fee?

Who pays the fee? (Does an agency pay for the client; is it private pay, does insurance cover it?)

If insurance covers, which of the following are accepted: (circle all that are accepted)

Medicaid, Medicare, SAGA, Private Insurance, HUSKY

Are there any special instructions for accessing this service? (i.e. walk-in only, by appointment

only., apply through XYZ Agency, etc.)

If there is more than one site: Which site/sites offer this service?

 

 

PLEASE RETURN FORM:

By mail: Theresa Baylock, 2-1-1/United Way of Connecticut/ 1344 Silas Deane Hwy./Rocky Hill CT 06067

By Fax: 860-571-6060

By email: Theresa.baylock@ctunitedway.org

Questions? Call Theresa at 860-571-6053

Table of Contents

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Youth Enrichment Programs

Adult/Child Mentoring Programs

WATERBURY PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PARTNERS IN EDUCATION / WATERBURY

MENTOR PROGRAM - Connecticut Mentoring Partnership (CMP) Member

WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - Making A Connection

WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - One On One Mentoring Program

WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - UConn 4-H Mentoring

Camperships

 UNITED WAY OF GREATER WATERBURY - Greater Waterbury Campership

Program

Homework Help Programs

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY - Homework Help Program

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - GIRLStart and Girl

Empowerment After School Programs

Job Finding Assistance * Youth

 CT WORKS ONE STOP CAREER CENTERS - WATERBURY/DOL -

 MARRAKECH - ACADEMY FOR HUMAN SERVICE TRAINING - WATERBURY -

Work/Learn Youth Program

 MARRAKECH - WORK LEARN CENTER - WATERBURY - Work / Learn Youth

Program

 NEW OPPORTUNITIES - YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM - Youth Employment

Program

 NORTHWEST REGIONAL WORKFORCE INVESTMENT BOARD (NRWIB) - Summer

Youth Employment Program

 WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - Waterbury Summer Youth

Employment Program

Juvenile Delinquency Prevention

 CONNECTICUT JUNIOR REPUBLIC - WATERBURY AREA - Family Support

Center/Family With Service Needs

 SUPERIOR COURT, CONNECTICUT - JUVENILE MATTERS AT WATERBURY - Family

with Service Needs

 SUPERIOR COURT, CONNECTICUT - JUVENILE MATTERS AT WATERBURY - Youth

in Crisis

Juvenile Diversion

 CONNECTICUT JUNIOR REPUBLIC - WATERBURY AREA - Community Diversion

Program

intro page 1

Leadership Development

 NAUGATUCK VALLEY PROJECT (NVP) -

 WATERBURY HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER - Parent Leadership Training Institute

(PLTI)

 WATERBURY HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER - Parents Supporting Educational

Excellence (Parents SEE)

Leadership Development * Youth

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY - Keystone Club/Torch Club

 GIRL SCOUTS OF CONNECTICUT - WATERBURY SERVICE CENTER -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - Teen Leadership

Program

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

 HISPANIC COALITION OF GREATER WATERBURY - Youth Leadership Group

Physical Fitness

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT -

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

Playgrounds

 WATERBURY, CITY OF - MAEVE'S DREAMLAND BOUNDLESS PLAYGROUND -

Maeve's Dreamland, A Boundless Playground

Recreational Activities/Sports * Youth

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - GIRLStart and Girl

Empowerment After School Programs

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

 HISPANIC COALITION OF GREATER WATERBURY - After School Program –Tennis

Lessons

 SALVATION ARMY - WATERBURY CORPS COMMUNITY CENTER -

 WATERBURY POLICE ACTIVITIES LEAGUE -

 WATERBURY, CITY OF - RECREATION AND LEISURE -

Recreational/Leisure/Arts Instruction

 FAMILY SERVICES OF GREATER WATERBURY - SocialWISE For Families

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - Dancing Expressions

 HISPANIC COALITION OF GREATER WATERBURY - After School Program – Guitar

Classes/Folkloric Dance

Swimming Facilities

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

Swimming/Swimming Lessons

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

 WATERBURY, CITY OF - RECREATION AND LEISURE -

Tutoring Services

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - GIRLStart and Girl

Empowerment After School Programs

 WOW/NRZ COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER -

 WOW/NRZ COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER - Silence the Violence Program

Youth Enrichment Programs

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY -

 GIRL SCOUTS OF CONNECTICUT - WATERBURY SERVICE CENTER -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT -

 GIRLS INCORPORATED OF SOUTHWESTERN CONNECTICUT - GIRLStart and Girl

Empowerment After School Programs

 GREATER WATERBURY YMCA -

 REED SCHOOL FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER -

 SALVATION ARMY - WATERBURY CORPS COMMUNITY CENTER -

 WATERBURY POLICE ACTIVITIES LEAGUE -

 WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - Linking Academics to Life

 WOODROW WILSON FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER -

 WOW/NRZ COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER -

 WOW/NRZ COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER - Silence the Violence Program

intro page 3

Mental Health Resources

Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Units

 WATERBURY HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER - CRISIS ASSESSMENT AND TRIAGE

SERVICE

Adolescent/Youth Counseling

 FAMILY INTERVENTION CENTER - Natural Peer Helpers Program

 FAMILY SERVICES OF GREATER WATERBURY - Trauma-Focused Cognitive

Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

 PROSPERING VISION, A - OUTPATIENT SERVICES -

 WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) -

 WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - Youth and Family Emergency

Services Program (YFES)

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES - Outpatient

Psychiatric Enhanced Care Clinic for Children

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES -

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

Anger Management

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES -

Case/Care Management * Children

 CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, STATE OF CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF -

WATERBURY AREA OFFICE - Care Coordination and the System of

Care/Community

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES - System of

Care/Community Collaborative/Care Coordination (SOC)

Case/Care Management * Substance

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES - Case

Management for Chronic Relapsers

Child Guidance

 FAMILY SERVICES OF GREATER WATERBURY - Trauma-Focused Cognitive

Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

 PROSPERING VISION, A - OUTPATIENT SERVICES -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES - Outpatient

Psychiatric Enhanced Care Clinic for Children

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES -

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

Children's Protective Services

 CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, STATE OF CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF -

WATERBURY AREA OFFICE -

Children's Respite Care

 CONNECTICUT JUNIOR REPUBLIC - WATERBURY AREA - CARE (Center for

Assessment, Respite and Enrichment)

 DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES, STATE OF CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF - WEST

REGIONAL OFFICE, WATERBURY -

 EASTER SEALS REHABILITATION CENTER OF GREATER WATERBURY - EASTER

SEALS EMPLOYMENT INDUSTRIES -

Children's/Adolescent Residential

 NAFI CONNECTICUT - STEPPING STONE -

General Assessment for Substance

 CONNECTICUT COUNSELING CENTERS - WATERBURY SITE -

 FAMILY INTERVENTION CENTER -

 SAINT MARY'S HOSPITAL - BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES -

 WATERBURY HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER - WEST MAIN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES -

Mental Health Evaluation

 CATHOLIC CHARITIES - ARCHDIOCESE OF HARTFORD - WATERBURY - CHURCH

STREET SITE -

 CATHOLIC CHARITIES - ARCHDIOCESE OF HARTFORD - WATERBURY - WOLCOTT

STREET SITE -

 CONNECTICUT COUNSELING CENTERS - WATERBURY SITE -

 FAMILY SERVICES OF GREATER WATERBURY - Trauma-Focused Cognitive

Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

 SAINT MARY'S HOSPITAL - BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES -

 STAYWELL HEALTH CENTER - SOUTH END II -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES -

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

Planning/Coordinating/Advisory

 WATERBURY YOUTH SERVICE SYSTEM (WYS) - Youth Service Bureau

Psychiatric Day Treatment * Youth

 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH AFFILIATES - FAMILY CONNECTION II/WORTH

PROGRAM - Extended Day Treatment (EDT) for Youth/Family Connection

 WATERBURY HOSPITAL HEALTH CENTER - CHILD AND ADOLESCENT BEHAVIORAL

HEALTH - Partial Hospital/Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP)

Psychiatric Mobile Response Teams *

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - WATERBURY CLINICAL SERVICES - Emergency

Mobile Psychiatric Services (EMPS) for Children and Youth

intro page 5

Substance Abuse Counseling

 CATHOLIC CHARITIES - ARCHDIOCESE OF HARTFORD - WATERBURY - WOLCOTT

STREET SITE -

 CENTRAL NAUGATUCK VALLEY HELP - REVEREND EDWARD M. DEMPSEY DRUG

SERVICES -

 CONNECTICUT COUNSELING CENTERS - WATERBURY SITE - Outpatient Treatment

Program

 CONNECTICUT JUNIOR REPUBLIC - WATERBURY AREA - Outpatient Adolescent

Substance Abuse Treatment

 FAMILY INTERVENTION CENTER -

 FAMILY INTERVENTION CENTER - Project Hope

 MCCA - WATERBURY SATELLITE OFFICE -

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES - Adolescent

Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Program

Substance Abuse

 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF GREATER WATERBURY - Smart Girls & Smart Moves

Prevention Awareness Program

 CENTRAL NAUGATUCK VALLEY REGIONAL ACTION COUNCIL -

 CONNECTICUT COUNSELING CENTERS - WATERBURY SITE -

 FAMILY INTERVENTION CENTER - Natural Peer Helpers/Mediators

 MCCA - WATERBURY SATELLITE OFFICE - Community Outreach and Education

Program

 WELLMORE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH - ADULT OUTPATIENT SERVICES –

Early Care & Education

Early Care & Education Child Care Center

Family Child Care

Nursery School

Summer Camp/Program


 

 

 

 

 

 

Faith

Education

Counseling

Substance Abuse

HealthCare

Basic Needs

Children’s

Activities

Business

Recreation

Food

Housing

 

 

Access to Health Services

Clinical Preventive Services

Environmental Quality

Injury and Violence

Maternal, Infant, and Child Health

Mental Health

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity

Oral Health

Reproductive and Sexual Health

Social Determinants

Substance Abuse

Tobacco

 

State and Local
Government Finance

Federalism and
Intergovernmental Relations

Health Care

Workforce, Welfare, and
Social Services

Education

New York State Activities

Government Reform

Cities and Neighborhoods

Faith-Based Social Services

Program Management

Public Safety, Disasters,
and Homeland Security


 

 

 

 

RESULTS

INDICATORS THAT ALIGN WITH EACH RESULT

SHORT‐TERM RESULTS

 

 

Children are ready to enter school

? Immunizations

? More children with health insurance1

? Children in expected height and weight range for their age2

? Availability of early childhood education programs

? Attendance at early childhood education programs

? Parents read to children3

? Vision, hearing, and dental status

 

Students attend school consistently

 

? Daily attendance

? Early chronic absenteeism

? Tardiness

? Truancy

 

Students are actively involved in learning and their community

 

? Students feel they belong in school

? Availability of in‐school and after‐school programs

? Students feel competent

? Schools are open to community

? Attendance at in and after‐school programs

? Partnerships for service learning in the school/community

? Post‐secondary plans

 

Schools are engaged with families and community

 

? Trust between faculty and families

? Teacher attendance and turnover

? Faculty believe they are an effective and competent team

? Community‐school partnerships

 

Families are actively involved in their children’s education

 

? Families support students’ education at home

? Family attendance at school‐wide events and parent‐teacher conferences,

? Family experiences with school‐wide events and classes

? Family participation in school decision‐making

 

1 Schorr, Lisbeth B. and Vicky Marchand. Pathway to Children Ready for School and Succeeding at Third Grade. Pathways

Mapping Initiative, 2007. http://www.cssp.org/uploadFiles/3RD%20GRADE%20PATHWAY%20PDF%209‐07.pdf

2 Ibid.

3 Ibid.

 

LONG‐TERM RESULTS

 

 

Students succeed academically

 

? Standardized test scores

? Teachers support students

? Grades

? Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching

? Graduation rates

? Dropout rates

 

Students are healthy: physically, socially and emotionally

 

? Asthma control

? Vision, hearing, and dental status

? Physical fitness

? Nutritional habits

? Positive adult relationships

? Positive peer relationships

 

Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments

 

? Students, staff, and families feel safe

? Schools are clean

? Families provide basic needs

? Incidents of bullying

? Reports of violence or weapons

 

Communities are desirable places to live

 

? Employment and employability of residents and families served by the school

? Student and families with health insurance

? Community mobility and stability

? Juvenile Crime

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


http://www.discovery.wcgmf.org/search/site

The Discovery initiative is focused on young children from birth through age eight. To improve early school success, it takes a comprehensive approach to supporting young children and families. The following Keys to Success guide the work of Discovery.

 


The First 1000 Days: Getting it Right From the Start

http://www.chdi.org/ 

-------------------------------------------------

 

click here

Connecticut’s Children: Off to a Healthy Start

Briefing Paper #3

Judith C. Meyers, Ph.D.

President and CEO

Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut

October 2012

 

Seven Habits of Early Childhood Health

1.Mothers receive prenatal care beginning in the first trimester and do not expose their babies to toxic substances during or after their pregnancies.

2.Children are born at full term and at a healthy weight.

3.Once born, children have sufficient and good nutrition and grow within healthy weight guidelines.

4.Children form strong bonds with nurturing caregivers, including parents and childcare providers, who have the psychological resources to provide responsive caregiving.

5.Children live in homes free of toxic stressors (environmental, physical and emotional).

6.Children live in safe communities with access to parks, recreation, and healthy foods.

7.Children have a medical and dental home (and the health insurance to pay for these services) resulting in:

 

a. well-child visits according to the American Academy of Pediatrics schedule

b. all recommended immunizations

c. screening for developmental delays and linkage to needed services

d. screening for lead toxicity, iron deficiency, and chronic disease such as asthma and allergies

e. oral health promotion beginning at age one

f. needed supports for families of children with special health care needs

 


http://www.chdi.org/ 

 

click here

CARE COORDINATION

AND CHILDREN

Care coordination is especially important for children, as they benefit most when their needs are detected early and they receive intervention services.2 In addition, children’s care frequently involves utilization of many service systems, including health care, early care and education, and community services. The primary care medical home is an ideal venue for detecting children’s problems at the earliest possible age and connecting families to helpful interventions and supports outside of the primary care site, and often beyond the boundaries of the health care system to early education and family support services. It is important then that all children have a medical home, from which they can receive preventive health services and be connected to other services to ensure their healthy development.

Despite the proven effectiveness of care coordination services, their provision in pediatric practices is often less than optimal. Barriers to providing  care coordination services include: lack of time, reimbursement, and practice staff; lack of medical specialty and community services to which children can be connected; lack of integrated data systems to support care linkage of patients to services and to inform providers about services their patients use outside of the medical home; and lack of integration across the many systems that serve children and families.3,4 When these barriers can be overcome, evidence supports the provision of care coordination from the medical home.5

 

There is much evidence that Connecticut’s children often do not receive coordinated care when needs are identified:

• A 2002 analysis of state Medicaid data revealed that “relatively few children received timely office or clinic visits following an emergency visit for treatment of asthma (20%) or a hospital discharge (40%). Follow-up rates have not improved in recent years and are well below treatment guidelines.” 6

• Almost half of the children referred to the state’s Early Intervention services are found not eligible and require linkage to other services through Help Me Grow.7 This linkage requires seven contacts on average for successful connection of at-risk children to services.8

• According to surveys of parents of Children & Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) in Connecticut, 76% indicate that their primary care provider does not work with them to create a written care plan for their child. Half of the responding parents said that they did not have an identified person at their child’s medical home to assist with referrals, help locate needed services, and assist with communication among all of their child’s care providers.9

 


National Day of Prayer

http://nationaldayofprayer.org/outreach/7x7/ 

Seven Centers of Power

 

 

 


The Truth Project  http://www.thetruthproject.org/

sector1.jpg (100154 bytes)

click to enlarge 

 

Lesson 1 - Veritology: What is Truth?

The Truth Project begins by defining truth as "that which corresponds to reality." This absolute and eternal truth, at the heart of Jesus' mission on earth, continues to be the focal point of the Cosmic Battle in our own time. 

Lesson 2 - Philosophy and Ethics: Says Who?

Truth is not simply an academic concept. The way we think about truth has a direct bearing upon the way we live our lives. What's more, our understanding of right and wrong is directly dependent on our worldview: is the universe God's creation or a closed cosmic cube? 

Lesson 3 - Anthropology: Who is Man?

The Bible tells us that man was created in God's image but fell from innocence through sin. Modern psychology, on the other hand, asserts that man is inherently good and behaves badly only under the influence of social or institutional pressure. This lesson explores the implications of both views. 

Lesson 4 - Theology: Who is God?

Eternal life, according to Jesus, is knowing God in an intimate, personal, and relational way. Such knowledge, which is possible only because of divine revelation, transforms us from the inside out as we begin to see ourselves in the light of His majesty and holiness. 

Lesson 5 - Science: What is True?

Science, the "systematic study of the natural world," brings to light innumerable evidences of Intelligent Design. But Darwinian theory transforms science from the honest investigation of nature into a vehicle for propagating a godless philosophy. (Part One)

A careful examination of molecular biology and the fossil record demonstrates that evolution is not a "proven fact." Meanwhile, history shows that ideas, including Darwinism as a social philosophy, have definite consequences that can turn ugly when God is left out of the picture. (Part Two) 

Lesson 6 - History: Whose Story?

Does the past have an objective actuality and significance? Or does it, as postmodernist philosophy asserts, exist primarily inside our heads? This tour considers the meaning of history as God's story and shows us why remembering is so important. 

Lesson 7 - Sociology: The Divine Imprint

The order we observe in the natural realm is even more apparent in the social systems God has established: family, church, community, state, labor, and the union between God and man. Life is a series of relationships that flow out of and reflect the Trinitarian nature of the Creator. 

Lesson 8 - Unio Mystica: Am I Alone?

Is it possible for the infinite, eternal Creator to dwell within the heart of an individual? The implications of this great mystery, which represents the very core of the Christian faith, are explored at length in this examination of the most intimate of the social spheres. 

Lesson 9 - The State: Whose Law?

Of all the social spheres, the state, to which God grants the power of the sword for the punishment of evil and the preservation of the good, has the greatest potential to go awry if it oversteps its authority. The civil magistrate must always remember his place under the sovereignty of God – otherwise, havoc will ensue. 

Lesson 10 - The American Experiment: Stepping Stones

America is unique in the history of the world. On these shores a people holding to a biblical worldview have had an opportunity to set up a system of government designed to keep the state within its divinely ordained boundaries. Tour #10 follows the history of this experiment and explores what happens to freedom when God is forgotten. 

Lesson 11 - Labor: Created to Create

Contrary to a great deal of contemporary popular opinion, work is not a "curse." God Himself is active and creative, and He calls man to share in the joy of His activity and creativity. Labor, economics, media, and the creative arts all have a role to play in magnifying the glory of the Creator. 

Lesson 12 - Community and Involvement: God Cares, do I?

The ethical law and the meaning of the Christian life are summed up in the commandment to love God and one's neighbor. This command is the source of the believer's motivation for self-sacrificial service to the needy and their personal involvement in our culture. 

 

 


Connecticut Voices for Children  http://www.ctvoices.org/ 

Pulling Apart: Connecticut Income Inequality 1977 to Present

Wade Gibson & Sara Kauffman

Over the last three decades, Connecticut has shifted from being one of the most egalitarian states to having one of the biggest income gaps between rich and poor households, as indicated in this report by the Connecticut Association for Human Services and Connecticut Voices for Children.

  • Over this period, Connecticut experienced the greatest increase in income inequality among all states between its high and low-income households. In 1977-79, the gap between the richest fifth and the middle fifth of families in Connecticut was relatively low, ranking 42nd among all states, but the state ranked 7th highest in inequality by 2005-07. Similarly, the gap between the richest and poorest fifth of households is now the 3rd worst in the country, up from 46th.
  • The greatest share of income gains have gone to the wealthiest 1 percent, who have vastly outpaced even the very well-off. The share of total state Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) going to the top 1 percent has soared over the last two decades, increasing from 17% to 28%.
  • The 99th percentile of taxpayers in Connecticut earn about $766,000 in state AGI, over $500,000 more than the $225,000 earned by well-off households at the 95th percentile. The income of the near-rich is actually closer to that of the poorest fifth of households, who earn $17,000, than it is to the $766,000 earned by the wealthiest Connecticut residents.
  • Connecticut’s inequality ranks second only to New York’s among U.S. states on the Gini coefficient, one of the most widely used measures of inequality.

 

 


From Michelle Hill VYSB

 

Emergency Services

Non-Emergency Services

Abuse Services

AIDS/HIV

Alcohol/Substance Abuse

Child/Parent Services

Counseling

Clothing

Crime Victim

Day Care

Disabilities

Education-Adult/Continuing

Employment/Job Training

Family Planning

Financial Assistance

Food Resources

Health Information

Household Goods - Free/ Low cost

Housing

Juvenile Court/Justice

Legal

Prenatal/Maternity

Recreation/Parks

Rent Subsidies

Shelters

Support Groups/Parenting

Translation - Language

Hotlines

Basic needs

Prevention Services

Early intervention Programs

Sexual Minority Services

Other Services

Counselors


From 211 Infoline

 

 

Cat.
#

Category Name from 211CT

1

*ABUSE/DOMESTIC VIOLENCE/SEXUAL ASSAULT

2

*ADVOCACY

3

*ANIMAL SERVICES

4

*CASE/CARE MANAGEMENT

5

*CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

6

*CONSUMER SERVICES/FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

7

*DISASTER AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

8

*DONATING AND VOLUNTEERING

9

*EDUCATION AND LITERACY

10

*EMPLOYMENT/TRAINING/BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

11

*ENVIRONMENT

12

*FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND MATERIAL AID

13

*FOOD

14

*GOVERNMENT SERVICES/CIVIC PARTICIPATION

15

*HEALTH

16

*HOTLINES/HELPLINES

17

*HOUSING AND RESIDENTIAL CARE

18

*INFORMATION SERVICES

19

*LEGAL SERVICES/CRIMINAL JUSTICE

20

*MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE

21

*OLDER ADULTS AND PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

22

*SUPPORT GROUPS

23

*TRANSPORTATION

24

*OTHER

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Spectrum of prevention

Influencing Policy & legislation

Changing Organizational Practices

Fostering Coalitions & Networks

Educating providers

Promoting Community Education

Strengthening Individual Knowledge & Skills

 

 

 

 

Social Determinants of Health  
General socio-economic, cultural and environmental conditions  
Living and working conditions

Work environment
Education
Agricultural and food production
unemployment
Water and sanitation
Healthcare services
Housing

 
Social and community networks  
Individual lifestyle factors  
Age, sex and constitutional factors  

 

Income and social status

Biology and genetic endowment

healthy Child Development
Social support Networks
Education and Literacy
Culture
Physical and Social Environments
Employment/working condition
Health Services
Personal Health Practices and Coping Skills
Gender

 

2020 Vision

Final statement on the Connecticut Association for Human Services  (CAHS) 

Our Mission

Connecticut Association for Human Services works to end poverty and to engage, equip and empower all families in Connecticut to build a secure future.

OPPORTUNITY IN CONNECTICUT: The Impact of Race, Poverty and Education on Family Economic Success

http://cahs.org/pdf/OpportunityInCT.pdf

Even the most intractable social problems can be eliminated. To improve the educational attainment of all students—and the life opportunities of all residents—Connecticut policymakers and administrators must understand this is more than an issue of achievement test scores and fiscal accountability. Inequality is a moral as well as economic issue that is within our power to change, and change is needed for the well-being of our state, now and in the future.

VISION

We need to have a vision we can work towards.  Do we all agree to where we’re heading? If we don’t know where we’re going, any road will get us there!

LEADERSHIP

SCALABILITY

We need to know as to what scale we have to address in order to be the most successful and economical with our resources. 

 “Taking the high road is most often the one less traveled” Mixed metaphors!

Take the high road, it’s the one less traveled! 

Wants and needs

Basic necessities versus “Quality of Life”

·         Poverty

·         Fatherlessness

·         Education

o   Achievement Gap

o   Underachieving, failing schools

o   Attendance

o   Behavior School Climate 

§  Bullying Legislation

o   Remediation at Community Colleges

·         Food Security

·         Hunger

·         Employment (The best social service program is a JOB!)

o   Unemployment rates

o   Under employment

·         Need for skilled labor

·         Job Creation

·         Issues of Race

o   Profiling

·         Transportation

o   Transit-Oriented Development, (TOD) 

·         

·         Health

o   Physical

§  Preventative

·         Exercise

·         Healthy diet

·         Check-Ups/Screenings

·         Environmental

o   

o   Behavioral/Mental

o   Safety

§  Crime

·         Incarcerated parents

·         Gang participation

·         Narcotics trafficking

·         Sex trafficking

§  Personal Safety

·         Bullying, (change the term bully to being mean)

·         Sexual abuse

o   Date Rape

o   Incest/molestation 

·         A

·         B

·         Quality of Life

o   Environmental

·         Sports

·         Cultural activities 

·         

·         Creating a strong educated workforce

·         D

·         E

·         F

·         G

·         H

·         I

Passion & Process; the right mixture

When preparing to implement a plan, too much “process” without enough passion, results will be slow.  Too much passion without any “process”, it could blow-up in your face.  Both extremes produce would therefore produce low, no or harmful results. 

Combine funding sources; (from a high ranking Federal Human Services staff member).  At this point, multiple funding streams enter each state through various programs.  They are then often re-combined, but many are no in collaborative initiatives, but upon closer study would reveal and excessive amount of overhead.  We could and should work to eliminating redundancy, decreasing overhead, better deployment administrative staffing, and make wiser utilization of meetings.  No one would have to lose jobs.  Instead they would be re-allocated to direct assistance instead of the layers of bureaucracy. 

Why does this matter?

Connecticut’s Competiveness in the country, the world

The U.S ‘s competitiveness in the world

What is a super-power? Is it important?


Care coordination making new connections and strengthening new connections and inventing necessary connections and partnerships

Start with a vision

Kingdom Solutions

The Eagle Project .us

"Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. " ~Dr. Seuss

Saint Bernard’s facilities

House on School Street

Fair Broker

Advocate for those in need.

Scripture

What good does it do to…?

I am your God, you are my people.

Love one another as I have loved

_________________________________________________________

SWOT

Why Participate

We are all Change Agents with dreams and goals. We are all Allies with knowledge and expertise. If you need help with or know something about

  • Education
  • Business
  • Health
  • Finances
  • Housing
  • Others

Interventions Organized by Policy Area:

(click on the links)

http://evidencebasedprograms.org/wordpress/

PRENATAL / EARLY CHILDHOOD

K-12 EDUCATION

POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION

TEEN PREGNANCY PREVENTION

CRIME/VIOLENCE PREVENTION

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS

EMPLOYMENT AND WELFARE

SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION/TREATMENT

OBESITY PREVENTION/TREATMENT

MENTAL HEALTH

HEALTH CARE FINANCING/DELIVERY

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

HELPFUL

HARMFUL

INTERNAL

STRENGTHS

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

 

WEAKNESSES

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

 

EXTERNAL

OPPORTUNITIES

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

 

 

THREATS

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

·      ______

 

 

Catalog the resources

Champion

Advocate

Our vision is to function as the HUB on the wheel of community services by networking all available resources for responding to and assisting in meeting the needs of families and individuals to move them toward self-sufficiency -- all to the glory of God.

Solutions

Vision, goals

Furthering education with college as the “expectation”  If we start with a vision, speak it and believe it it will become reality.

Strengths

     
       
       

Categories for community work

Sectors

 

Childcare

 

Education

 

Employment

 

Faith Community

 

Health

 

Housing 

 

Nutrition

 

Transportation

 

Utilities

 

Forums

 

Food security

 

Homelessness

 

Job Creation & Workforce training

 

Education

 

Seniors

 

 

CRT Programs

Early Care and Education | Employment & Training | Energy Services | Economic Literacy & Asset Building | Housing | Mental Health | Neighborhood Services | Re-entry & Criminal Justice | Senior Services | Shelter & Supportive Housing | Volunteering | Youth | The Meadows

·         EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION

Head Start, School Readiness and Child Care Centers
Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
Early Winners

·         EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING, AND LIFESKILLS

Capital City YouthBuild
Middlesex Education and Training Consortion (METC)
Real Fathers, Real Men
SNAP Employment and Training
Summer Youth Employment and Learning Program
Year-Round Youth Employment

·         ENERGY AND WEATHERIZATION

Connecticut Energy Assistance Program (CEAP)
Weatherization
Weatherization Residential Assistance Program (WRAP)

·         ECONOMIC LITERACY AND ASSET BUILDING

Financial Literacy
Individual Development Account Program (IDA)
Income Tax Preparation Assistance (VITA)

·         HOUSING

Affordable Housing
Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention

·         MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT

Access to Recovery
Asian Family Services
Behavioral Health Services
Clinical Homeless Outreach
Ryan White Behavioral Health

·         NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES

Community Resource Centers
SAGA Case Management
Suburban Outreach

Back to top

·         RE-ENTRY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Alternative In The Community
Building Bridges
Byrne Memorial Housing Program
DMHAS/CORP Transitional Housing Program
DMHAS Transitional Case Management (for Offenders)
DOC Project Transition Program
Fresh Start
Re-Entry Recovery Services
Supportive Housing for Probationers
Veterans Crossing

·         SENIOR SERVICES

Coventry Place Affordable Senior Apartments
Gatekeeper Program
Generations Housing Community for Seniors and Grandfamilies
Grocery Delivery Program for Seniors
Meals on Wheels
RSVP
Senior Community Cafés
The Retreat Affordable Assisted Living Community

·         SHELTER AND SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

McKinney Shelter
McKinney Day Respite Program
East Hartford Community Shelter
Permanent Supportive Housing
Project TEACH
Scattered-Site Housing
Supportive Housing Collaborative
Domestic Violence Supportive Housing

Veterans Crossing

·         VOLUNTEERING AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

National Arts Program
National Arts Program Winners 2011-2012
RSVP
CATCH Healthy Habits
Volunteer Opportunities

·         YOUTH SERVICES

Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)
Community Housing Assistance Program (CHAPs)
Early Winners
Healthy Teen Hartford Coalition
Summer Food Program
Youth Artisan and Technology Center (YAT)

·         MEADOWS REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT AND PROPERTY MGMT.

 

 

 

Dr. Embry triple P Program

On ALL Our Children’s futures having few

barriers to productive lives…

depression

bipolar/schizophrenia

drugs

tobacco

alcohol

ADHD

learning disabilities aggression

stealing

suicide

depression

crime

violence exposure

dangerous acts

asthma

obesity cancer

heart-disease

diabetes

hi-blood pressure

unstable work history

Wednesday, October 3, 12 20

 

http://newbethelfellowship.com/22501.html

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_22505.gif

"I tell you the truth, just as you did for one of the least of these brothers or sisters of mine you did it for me." Matthew 25:40

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_23301.gif

Our vision is to function as the HUB on the wheel of community services by networking all available resources for responding to and assisting in meeting the needs of families and individuals to move them toward self-sufficiency -- all to the glory of God.

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_23305.gif

the HUB Ministries is a non-denominational group of volunteers who have been trained to case manage families or individuals toward the goal of employment and self-sufficiency. Also, to direct them to assistance all ready available through other agencies and ministries in the Montgomery County area.

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_23309.gif

We are a faith based organization working under the 501(c)3 of New Bethel Fellowship Church. The HUB Ministries relies on donations, grants and volunteers.

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_23313.gif

We ask that you refer to us an individual or family in need of assistance. We will assign a case manager who will work with the family or individual to:

Determine how or if they qualify for assistance from the various ministries and agencies all ready available in our community.

If they need food we will contact the food pantries and arrange for them to receive food.

If they need prescriptions we will contact the agency or ministry organized and prepared to help with prescriptions.

If they need clothing we will arrange for them to receive clothing from the agency or ministry providing clothing.

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_23325.gif

To assist the agencies and ministries all ready active and working in our community by sending only those who qualify for their assistance. If a person does not qualify we will seek assistance from the church community.

http://newbethelfellowship.com/img/content/22501_57001.gif

Our volunteer caseworkers are here to assist people on

Monday 9 am - 12 noon

Tuesday 9 am - 12 noon

Thursday 9 am - 12 noon

We do recommend calling ahead to be sure we have volunteers in that day. (765) 362-8840

 

 

 

 

 

 


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